Andrea Belluso’s Clever Solution for Shooting Shiny Surfaces

Written by Andrea Belluso on . Posted in The Light Shaper

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© Andrea Belluso

© Andrea Belluso

Andrea Belluso is an experienced photographer with more than three decades in the business. Every now and then, Andrea takes us behind the scenes of a recent shoot to share some of the knowledge he has gained over the years. This time he gets out of the comfort zone and shoots something he’s never done before. Here’s his story about it. 

Something strange happened. I was asked to do something I have never done before: shooting kitchen appliances and wash machines. This is also something that is extremely specialized in terms of lighting because of all the highly reflective surfaces involved.

The client was Electrolux and the brief made me feel a bit more at home since it was involving lifestyle with some models. The project was to promote their range of compact kitchen appliances. The images will feature in a trend report and on social media channels to highlight global urbanization and how this impacts sustainability and the effect on the size of our living spaces. This means that it is also a subject matter that I found interesting.

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What’s Different when You’re Shooting with High-Speed Sync?

Written by Jared Platt on . Posted in Lighting Tips

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What’s the Difference? is a series of video lighting tutorials. Each episode responds to a single question. In this episode, Jared Platt compares shooting with and without Profoto High-Speed Sync (HSS). The entire series, including all videos, articles and lighting diagrams, is available at our website. And feel free to leave a question to Jared in the comment section if you have one!

We had a great idea for a lighting challenge: take a bride and groom out on the sand dunes and make beautiful and dramatic portraits under the harsh sun using Profoto High-Speed Sync (HSS) to control the ambient light.

So, we headed out to the desert. The weather reported clouds and a 20% chance of rain, which in the desert means an 80% chance of nothing and another 20% chance of pretty much nothing. But when we arrived at our location, the weather reports did not match the scene before us. The clouds were thick and the wind was cold. We knew we were going to get rain very soon. But we had driven over three hours for this shot. So had our bride and groom. So we got out on the dunes and made the shot as quickly as possible.

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On To Light Shaping: Michelle Turner’s Lighting Solution Fits Into a Single Carry-On Bag

Written by Harley Anderson on . Posted in Videos

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On to Light Shaping is a new video series in which get to see 18 renowned portrait and wedding photographer create magic with Profoto Off-Camera Flash. In this video we join photographer Michelle Turner for a shoot at a majestic concert venue in Luxembourg. When you are done watching, click here to see the rest of the series.

Michelle Turner is a photographer on the move, splitting her time between Maine, Pennsylvania and wherever else her assignments take her to. Michelle admits she was unsure how she would like her new B2 Off-Camera Flash, because she really loves her trusted B1 Off-Camera Flash. Uncertainly changed to excitement, though, as soon as she realized how light and compact the new flash was.

“For traveling photographers such as myself, the Off-Camera Flash system is a real game changer,” says Michelle. “For the first time I am able to pack an entire lighting solution, including stands, into a single carry-on bag. I can now take my lights places I never would have considered before.”

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Stunning On-Location Portraits of Seven Ethiopian Tribes

Written by Rebecca Ahremark on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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© Arne Hodalic & Katja Bidovec

Inspired by the work of Edward S. Curtis and Richard Avedon, photographers Arne Hodalic and Katja Bidovec built a portable studio in Ethiopia with the goal to present the ethnic groups living on Eastern and Western banks of the Omo River and in the vicinity of Lake Turkana. In their trunk: The B1 Off-Camera Flash and a couple of Light Shaping Tools

Arne Hodalic, a slovenian photo journalist and photography teacher, tried a lot of professions (such as biology professor and skipper) before he decided to change his course and start to work as a professional photographer. He has been published in more prestigious magazines than you can imagine. Arne also works as a photo editor for National Geographic / Slovenia.

Katja Bidovec, an emergent photographic talent was Arne’s student at University of Ljubljana, later became his photo assistant and soon after, she started her own photographic career. Her passion is street photography but she works a lot in a studio and she took care of all the digital development of their Pristine Ethiopia project.

We had a little chat with Arne Hodalic about their new project, Prestine Ethiopia.

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What’s the Difference Between a Bare Head and an Umbrella Deep?

Written by Jared Platt on . Posted in Lighting Tips

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What’s the Difference? is a series of video lighting tutorials. Each episode responds to a single question. In this episode, Jared Platt compares a bareheaded off-camera flash with an umbrella deep. The entire series, including all videos, articles and lighting diagrams, is available at our website. And feel free to leave a question in the comment section if you have one!

In the mountains of Utah is a little storybook valley called Midway, where we shot this child life portrait. As the sun, diffused by the thin cloud cover on the horizon, prepared to drop below the mountaintops, it threw warm light across the sky and the lake shimmered in the warm glow. It was a perfect landscape backdrop to our adventure story.

Our goal for this shoot was to compare the effect of a bareheaded flash to that of an Umbrella Deep Silver M. Our main light was the B2 Off-Camera Flash, which was used with and without the umbrella. Between our two shots, the main light was the only light we changed, but there were three total lights on the set. A single B2 battery pack was powering two B2 Heads, our main light to light the children (set off to the right of the frame), and a second light (placed off frame right behind the children) for the purposes of adding a slight rim light on the children and a little extra light on the ground behind them. To separate the second B2 Head from the battery pack, an Extension Cable 3M was used.

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