This Car Is Moving At Walking Pace. Promise.

Written by Rebecca Ahremark on . Posted in Commercial Photography

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Frequent readers of our blog might recognise the name Richard Dole. (Those of you who don’t, click here and here to catch up with the rest of us.) Now, Richard is back with another story for speed freaks and motor heads. Here it is, in his own words.

I’ve had the wonderful opportunity over the past 10 months to photograph the development of the latest racing car from Nissan. The Japanese car company is returning to the Le Mans 24 Hour race in France and the World Endurance Championship series competing at the highest level with their new GT-R LM NISMO prototype.

Ten days before Christmas I was at the Circuit of the Americas (COTA) in Austin, Texas to photograph the car for the first time in full race trim. Also on location was a 150 person film crew producing the Nissan Super Bowl ad in which the racing car would make its worldwide debut. My assignment was to produce images for the print and online collateral material that would be released as soon as the TV ad aired.

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Blair Bunting Uses High-Speed Sync to Shoot a Jaw-Droppingly Stunning Super Bowl Commercial

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Commercial Photography

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Curious to know how Blair Bunting created his jaw-droppingly stunning Super Bowl commercial? We can give you a hint. The B1 and Profoto High-Speed Sync was involved. Keep reading to learn the rest.

Blair Bunting, award-winning commercial photographer based in Phoenix, Arizona, has blown our minds more than once. But this time he took things to a whole new level.

Using B1 Off-Camera Flashes upgraded with the recently released High-Speed Sync upgrade, Blair shot super sharp still images that was layered and fused in post production to create a moving still image (if that makes sense).

The effect is reminiscent of slowmotion video, but with the clarity and detail of a still image.

Blair calls the effect parallax.

“What is parallax?” he asks on his blog. “Think of when you were in grade school and you had to do one of those cheesy plays where every parent in the audience thinks that his or her child should be in search of a talent agency because they memorized 23 words and did not faint on stage. Sorry, got distracted there. Anyway, there is always a part in that play where some kid is on a boat made of a tricycle and cardboard, and they are in the rough ocean. In order to create this imaginary ocean in the elementary school cafeteria, they use whats called parallax. This is where they have on set of blue waves on a stick in front of the kid and one behind. The movement of these waves back and forth creates in your mind the idea of the ocean.”

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How Joe McNally Turned An Empty Room Into a Scary Halloween Fairy Tale

Written by Rebecca Ahremark on . Posted in Commercial Photography

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© Joe McNally

© Joe McNally

© Joe McNally

© Joe McNally

Sometimes, you just have to let your imagination run free. That’s exactly what photographer Joe McNally did for this Halloween-inspired shoot. Borned and raised on comic books and vivid imaginations of Mordor, Joe’s imagination ran all the way back to his darkest childhood fantasies.

In a recently published story on his blog, Joe McNally reveals how he turned an empty room into a scary Halloween fairy tale. With great help from a brilliant body painter, a talented hair stylist, producers and assistants, Joe turned his vision into reality.

Lighting-wise, Joe brought a bit of everything. He had three AcuteB2 battery generators, one powerful B4 battery generator and two B1 Off-Camera Flashes. He also added five SB 910 speed lights to the mix.

“Each light had a job to do, in a specific area of the photo,” Joe writes. “Then they all had to mesh into something plausible.”.

It all started with a shimmer and an idea and ended up as really amazing images.

Head over the his blog for the full story. This is too good to miss.

Frederic Schlosser’s Solution for Shooting Cars on Location

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Commercial Photography

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@ Frederic Schlosser

@ Frederic Schlosser

Shooting cars is a challenge. They are big, shiny and oddly shaped. German photographer Frederic Schlosser and his assistant took two cars, one classic sport car from the 1970’s and a comtemporty model of the same car and drove to Prague, Czech Republic. Here’s how he shot the two cars using the Profoto 1 Location Kit.

In the trunk: Frederic’s camera, his Profoto B1 Location Kit and a SoftboxRFi 1×4’. The Plan: shoot the two cars on location with the beautiful, old buildings in the background.

“I love fast cars,” says Frederic. “I love good car design, and I love driving cars. That’s why I got into car photography. It allows me to live out my two biggest passions in life!” Read More

How Andrew McGibbon Made a Rock Band in a Parking Lot Look Like a 19th Century Painting

Written by Rebecca Ahremark on . Posted in Commercial Photography

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When Indie Rock band JORDI needed a promo image to coinside with their debut album, photographer Andrew McGibbon was their first and only choice. With total creative control Andrew put them on boat and started to make magic.

“For some reason, I entered the conversation with the idea of a row boat in rough seas and they were all like “no way, we have a song about that!”. So it was pretty obvious that the idea fit from the get go and then it was just up to me to figure out how we would pull it off.” says Andrew McGibbon.

The lead singer of Jordi, Jordi van Dyk, had been a fan of Andrew’s work for some time so when it came to shooting their promo, he insisted it had to be Andrew. With a limited budget, Andrew’s condition was to have total creative control of the image.

“The great thing about focusing on a niche style in photography is that your client will end up giving you much more freedom in a job because they trust you – after all, they came to you for your style. Why would they want to stifle that?” says Andrew.

Andrew’s idea was clear right from the start. The image had to be dramatic, almost like a Turner painting. But he knew that the scene itself would be impossible to achieve on location and in only one shot. “You don’t need to be restricted by the natural or real and can create based on your imagination. There is much more room for magic.” says Andrew.

Andrew ended up playing the role as producer, art director and photographer and Jordi was happy to take his lead.

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