How to Build Up a Complex Lighting Setup Indoors

Written by Jared Platt on . Posted in Lighting Tips

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0004 Jared Platt for Profoto 600x400 How to Build Up a Complex Lighting Setup Indoors

©Jared Platt

On August 27, Profoto and photographer Jared Platt will host a free webinar on how to build up a complex lighting setup indoors . To get you in the mood for the webinar, Jared has written an article on the topic. Enjoy!

In the past few blog posts, I have discussed lighting outdoors, on location. Each time I arrive in a location, I am imediately looking for the existing light to set the mood of the shot, which means I am always scouting out the best locations and choosing the optimal time for the perfect direction and quality of light. While the process changes a bit on an indoor shoot (where I am manufacturing all of the light), the basic concepts don’t change all that much.

In our next webinar, we will discuss a shoot that occurred in a boxing ring in a hip old warehouse/gym/bar in Phoenix, Az, called The Duce. We chose this location for the shoot because it would require us to manufacture the light for the entire scene. While this required more lights and more set up, the principles of lighting the scene are no different than if we we’re outside. Instead of arriving on location and looking for the existing light, I arrived on location to a poorly lit warehouse and imagined the existing light in my mind and then reproduced it with one B1 off-camera flash and the appropriate Light Shaping Tools.

This first light sets the mood for the photograph, just like the sun’s existing light sets the mood and lighting direction on an outdoor shoot, only now we completely control our “sun.” Once the mood is set by our first light, we begin to build in the other lights one at a time to achieve the final finished image.

On this shoot, we are using four Profoto B1 off-camera flashes in manual mode.

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Neil van Niekerk on His Favorite Light Shaping Tool: the Softbox RFi 5′ Octa

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Lighting Tips

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Profoto Neil van Niekerk Softbox RFi John Carter 167 final 600x399 Neil van Niekerk on His Favorite Light Shaping Tool: the Softbox RFi 5 Octa

©Neil van Niekerk

Photographer Neil van Niekerk has a great blog. If you haven’t checked it out already, you should. It’s a great place to learn about lighting.

One of Neil’s most recents posts is titled “my favorite light modifier” and is basically a long love letter to the Softbox RFi 5′ Octa – a large, octagonal and extremely versatile softbox.

“When I first unfurled that thing in my studio, my reaction was, “holy crap, this is huge!” writes Neil. “My studio is 1000 sq ft, which is large, but you know, that’s also not that large. I was wondering if I should just return this to the camera store, and whether my 3×4 soft box would suffice.

“Then I started using the 5′ Octa softbox, and something clicked for me – one more thing fell into place for me in my understanding of light. My reaction turned from that perplexed, “holy crap!”, into a “holy smackeroni!” when I realized that the 5′ Octa is probably the single most versatile piece of lighting gear in my studio!”

Head over to Neil’s blog for the full story.

How to Do a Norman Rockwell Inspired Shoot in the Studio

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Lighting Tips

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 How to Do a Norman Rockwell Inspired Shoot in the Studio

©Joey Carrapichano

The iconic illustrations of American artist Norman Rockwell are a source of inspiration for many photographers. Want some tips and trick for how to create your own Norman Rockwell-inspired shot? Then keep reading, as Joey Carrapichano is about to share what he knows of the subject.

“I’ve always admired Norman Rockwell,” says Joey Carrapichano. “His illustrations are so vivid. The kids in them make the most amazing expressions. These expressions are a great source of inspiration for me. It’s something I try to also capture in my own photographs.”

Traces of Joey’s admiration for the American artist can be found in his own colorful, comic book-like photographs. The image above is a nice example of that. So how did Joey create that shot, you might ask?

For starters, unlike what you might think, the image was not shot on the beach but in Joey’s studio in Hamburg, Germany.

“It often rains here in Hamburg,” says Joey. “That’s why we decided to shoot in the studio and composite the background and the wall in Photoshop. We had a tight deadline and couldn’t risk delays because of bad weather.”

Tight deadlines and limited time frames were also the reasons behind Joey’s decision to shoot one kid at a time.

“I love photographing kids,” he says. “They’re always such a joy to work with. But they do loose interest quickly, which means you have very little time to get your shot. Because of this, I decided to photograph one kid at a time. I already knew what expression I wanted each kid to do, so I just figured it was better to nail one at a time, and then put them all together.

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Our Webinar on Dramatic Night Portraits Was Recorded and Is Now Available as a Video

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Lighting Tips

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On June 18, Profoto and photographer Jared Platt did a live webinar on how to shoot dramatic night portraits. Did you miss it? No worries. The webinar was recorded and is now available as a video.

Profoto hosts free webinars once a month. The next webinar will take place on August 27 at 7PM CET (August 27 at 10AM Los Angeles, 1PM New York, 6PM London, 7PM Paris // August 28 at 1AM Beijing, 2AM Tokyo, 3AM Sydney).

 Click here to sign up for the next one and we’ll send you a friendly reminder when it’s about to start.

For more information about the B1 Location Kit and the other Light Shaping Tools Jared is using in this video, please click here.

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How to Build Up a Dramatic Night Portrait in 5 Simple Steps

Written by Jared Platt on . Posted in Lighting Tips

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Today, Profoto and photographer Jared Platt will host a free webinar on how to take dramatic night portraits. To get you in the mood, Jared has written a post on the topic. Enjoy!

I am a documentary wedding and portrait photographer mostly, so a lot of the work I do requires me to shoot a lot of images very quickly.  Commercial work and editorial portraits allow me to slow down and focus on getting one shot.  It is a wonderful change of pace from weddings, almost like a little holiday…

For today’s webinar, we shot a series of portraits with one overarching rule: we could only use the two lights that come in the new Profoto B1 Location Kit.  But we wanted to further challenge ourselves by photographing at night.  The photo here is one of the many shots we acheived with piano rockstar Kevin Burdick.  Unlike the other images we made in the city, this shot was shot on a very dark soccer field out in suburbia farmland.  To get our intended shot, we had to “build” the shot out in stages.  Here’s how we did it.

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