How to Adjust Ambient Light to Work in Your Favour

Written by Drew Gurian on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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20140723 Ethan Leinwand 0059 2 600x400 How to Adjust Ambient Light to Work in Your Favour

©Drew Gurian

Drew Gurian is a young, up-and-coming portrait photographer based in Brooklyn, New York. Each month, he’ll be bringing you a behind the scene perspective, navigating the freelance marketplace of one of the busiest photo markets in the world – New York City. This is the second part of his story, in which he shares some advice on how to adjust ambient light to work in your favour.

Although I grew up just outside of the city in northern New Jersey, until January, I had never actually lived in the city.  Sure, I’ve spent tons of time here over the years, but I really enjoy being able to consider myself a New Yorker for the first time in my life.

I moved here for a few reasons.  It’s one of the largest markets in the world, which means that there’s always room to grow and evolve as a photographer.  I’m surrounded by tons of other creatives who inspire me, and I’m now right in the middle of this thriving community.  Being here also enables me to be around these friends more, meet tons of new people, and sooner or later, it will lead to new work.

Part of being in the midst of this very social scene includes finding a great local bar. Back in January, I was introduced to The Manhattan Inn, which has quickly become one of my favorite bar/restaurants.  Several nights a week, they have someone playing piano in the back room, and I absolutely love the atmosphere.

One performer in particular, Ethan Leinwand, used to play there every Friday and Saturday night.  His self-described style as a preservationist/blues/boogie-woogie player was the perfect fit for this place, and I went to see him play anytime I was in the city on a weekend.  His vintage look was seamless with the music he played, and I knew I needed to photograph him.

We exchanged cards, and after a few months or trying to align schedules, we finally made it happen a couple of weeks back.

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Here Are Some of the Self-portraits You Guys Have Shared with Us!

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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Yesterday, we published a short film by Ian Ruther, titled The Making of a Celebrity Portrait. If you haven’t seen it, you most definitely should.

If you already have, you know that the video ends with Ian encouraging you to share a self-portrait on Instagram with the hashtag #iamcelebrity

Below are some of the self-portraits that you guys have shared so far. The feed is continuously and automatically updated, so if you want to be part of it, take a self-portrait and hashtag i #iamthecelebrity

Ian will be looking at and commenting on the images all month. So this is your chance for some proper feedback from a creative soul with a sharp eye.

 

Ian Ruhter’s Most Challenging Portrait Ever: The Celebrity Portrait

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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Some shoots are just shoots. Others are an experience you walk away from knowing something you did not know before. Ian Ruhter‘s celebrity portrait shoot definitely belongs in the latter category.

Today, we have something special for you. Wet plates maestro Ian Ruhter has released a new video. It’s called The Making of a Celebrity Portrait, and it’s quite unlike any other video on portrait photography we’ve ever seen.

“Based on who this person is I knew I would scrutinize this image far more than any other portrait that I had ever made,” writes Ian about the project. “During this project The Making of a Celebrity Portrait, it redefined how I view celebrities. It made me question if celebrity culture influenced us so greatly that we want to be portrayed like them. In a world that revolves around social networking and selfies I started wondering what these images really say about us.

Ian also encourages viewers to engage in the project by sharing a portrait of themselves:

“NOW IT’S YOUR TURN! I’m asking you to include a photograph of yourself for this project. The idea is to collect many images so we can create one picture of who we really are. Hashtag a portrait of you with #iamthecelebrity on Instagram! All month long we’ll be cataloguing and commenting on these images. Once this is done we’ll create the final project! Stay tuned for updates by following me and Profoto.”

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Portraits of People’s Faces When Hit With A Stun Gun

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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Portrait photographer Patrick Hall wanted to capture real emotions in real people. So he held a camera to their face and hit them with 300.000 volts of electricity. The result? Some stunning (haaa…) portraits and one of the most talked about videos this week!

“As a portrait photographer, you’re always trying to get something real,” says Patrick Hall. “And what’s interesting about this photo shoot is that there is no way you can fake your emotion or your expression when you’re getting hit with 300.000 volts of electricity.

Well, we can’t argue with that, Patrick…

The video, posted by the good people at Fstoppers, spread like wildfire. Of course, watching the video, we couldn’t help but notice what tools Patrick was using – three Profoto D1 1.000 Ws moonlights, two HR Softboxes and a classic Zoom Reflector.

Those of you who want to get into the nitty gritty details about Patrick’s setup and solution should defintiely check out his thorough behind-the-scenes video, which you will find below.

You should also head over to Fstoppers for the full story and more final shots.

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Drew Gurian’s 5 Minute portrait with Ted Dwane of Mumford & Sons

Written by Drew Gurian on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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20140510 Ted Dwane 0086 2 copy 600x400 Drew Gurians 5 Minute portrait with Ted Dwane of Mumford & Sons

©Drew Gurian

Drew Gurian is a young, up-and-coming portrait photographer based in Brooklyn, New York. Each month, he’ll be bringing you a behind the scene perspective, navigating the freelance marketplace of one of the busiest photo markets in the world – New York City. This is the first part of his story.

When working with a notable personality in front of the camera, your time as a photographer is generally very limited. The bigger they are, the less time you get, and five minutes (or less) is what you can expect to have in this type of situation.

Of course, the idea is to hopefully get to the location or studio with more than enough time to set up, so that when the talent arrives, you can do when you need to do, and get them on their way.

My current record for a portrait sitting was with the rock band, Primus, who I shot last summer at a backstage portrait studio I had set up right outside of their RV. They walked out of the RV, onto my set, and then directly to the main stage to headline the festival.  I shot them in 18 seconds.

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