Brad Trent Captures the Grace of Soloist Dancer Misty Copeland

Written by Rebecca Ahremark on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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Misty Copeland

Remember Brad Trent, the photographer who did funny portraits of John Cleese? Well, he’s back from a new shoot. This time with Misty Copeland, the only African American soloist dancing with the American Ballet Theatre

In Brad Trent’s blog post we join him behind the stages of this shoot with the prestigious dancer. As with many shoots, Brad had limited amount of time and they were doing both cover, opening shots, portraits and a bunch of other cool stuff.

To do so, Brad used a couple of fast and powerful Profoto Pro 8-a along with some light shaping tools to get the look he wanted.

He performed pretty well, we must say. Great work, Brad!

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Bo Lelewel Shoots Cinematic Portraits with Profoto B1 and HSS

Written by Rebecca Ahremark on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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© Bo Lelewel

© Bo Lelewel

How do you capture the many faces of men with a cinematic touch? German photography and design student Bo Lelewel traveled all the way to Cuba to do just that. With the use of Profoto B1 and HSS he was able to get exactly the look he was going for. 

“I’ve always been drawn to photographing people and using studio lights to get the look I am after. I have been shooting a lot in the studio, but lately I like shooting on location even better”, says Bo.

Everything started when Bo and his friend, a filmmaker named Jan Stollberg, had an idea of a project. At first they were leaning towards doing the project in Iceland or Morocco, but ended up travelling all the way from Germany to Cuba. “I knew that I wanted to take portraits of the locals. But I have seen a lot of portraits of those people using only natural light”, says Bo.

Bo on the other hand did not want to be limited only to the use of ambient light. Instead, he wanted to mix ambient light and artificial light to achieve the cinematic look he was going for. In order to do that, he knew that he needed a portable yet powerful solution that was easy to bring along to Cuba, yet powerful enough for his needs.

“I used the B1, because I needed enough power to overpower the ambient light but without all the weight you usually get when using a studio light and a generator. The TTL function was also really helpful to get my first exposure, and then I was able to tweak it just a bit. I love the consistency of the flash output and the durability of Profoto gear”, says Bo.

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Dan Bannister Shooting Raw Portraits Through Soft Light

Written by Dan Bannister on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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© Dan Bannister

© Dan Bannister

Dan Bannister is a Canadian commercial photographer and filmmaker. With more than 20 years in the business, he felt like he wanted to tell a different story with his photography. He stumbled upon the story of the modern blacksmith. Here is the story of what happened from there on, written by Dan himself.

I’ve been working on a personal project about blacksmiths for a couple of years now. I was originally looking for a photo project that would be different than the usual work I do day-to-day for clients such as ad agencies, fashion retailers and magazines. I wanted it to be something that would allow me to focus on simple portraiture in a raw and revealing way but still had a common thread that had room to grow and evolve.

One day, I was having a casual lunch with a friend who is a creative at an ad agency in Toronto and she mentioned that blacksmithing was a hobby of hers. This immediately fascinated me because I didn’t realize that blacksmithing was something people still did, let alone in a big urban center like Toronto.

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What Is In a Portrait Photographer’s Gear Pack?

Written by Drew Gurian on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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20150301_Profoto_Gear_0014_2

Drew Gurian is a young, up-and-coming portrait photographer based in Brooklyn, New York. Each month, he’ll be bringing you a behind-the-scene perspective, navigating the freelance marketplace of one of the busiest photo markets in the world – New York City. This time, he talks about the lighting gear that he brings to a shoot. 

Lots of photographers think that in order to produce professional looking photos, they need a ton of gear. Of course, there’s plenty of situations out there that involve a sizable production, but for the most part, striving to keep things simple is a good rule of thumb to live by.

Every now and again, a client calls and needs me to shoot something that involves every piece of gear I own, and then some. For the most part however,  I’ve worked out a fairly stripped down gear pack that can get me through at least 75% of any shoot I get.

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Victoria Will Shoots Tintype Portraits of the Stars at Sundance

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Portrait Photography, Videos

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At this year’s Sundance Film Festival, photographer Victoria Will decided to put down her digital camera and use a century-old technique to shoot the stars. The result is celebrity portraits unlike any other you have ever seen before.

We all know the feeling of being stuck in a rut. So what do you do as a portrait photographer when you need to reignite your creative spark?

One thing you can do is switch tools. Replace the pen with a brush, and you will probably be surprised by what you end up putting on the canvas.

Celebrity photographer Victoria Will’s recent shoot at the Sundance Film Festival is a good example. Victoria had been shooting the stars at the festival for three years in a row when she started to feel as if she was reinventing the wheel every time. So for her fourth year, she replaced her DSLR with an old Graflex Super D camera and the TIFFs and JPGs with beautiful, aluminum tintypes.

The switch did not make things easier for Victoria, quite the opposite. But the demanding process resulted in some of the most inspired and highly praised portraits from that year’s festival.

“What I love about the process is how raw it is,” says Victoria. “We live in an age of glossy magazines and overly retouched skin. But there is no lying with tintypes. You can’t get rid of a few wrinkles in Photoshop.”

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