Christoph Jorda Lights Up an Ice Cave

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Sports Photography

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© Christoph Jorda

We don’t have any behind-the-scenes images to share from this shoot. And we honestly don’t know very much abou it. Still, this image is just too good not to share.

What we do know is that it was shot by German photographer Christoph Jorda. We know that he used a Profoto B1. And we know that the ice cave was not put in the image in post. It  was shot just the way it looks.

“This ice cave is a hidden jewel at about 3000 meter altitude in the middle of the Pitzal Glacier ski resort, says Christoph. “We hiked up there, two riders, one photographer, two B1s and a lot motivation.”

Once they reached the ice cave, Christoph and his team spent about an hour digging in the mountain side. They wanted the ice cave’s opening to be larger (so that more of the background would be visible). They also wanted the landing hill to be lower (to make the jump higher).

“After we were done, the two riders climbed on top of the cave,” says Christoph. “One of them prepared for the  jump. The other was holding one of the two B1s, which would be used as our main light on the guy doing the jump. Meanwhile, I set up the other B1 inside the cave. I wanted to show the smooth surface of the ice and the deep blue color of the cave. The best way to do that is to have a backlight.

“After a couple of test shots we were ready and good to go. We then had to wait for about 10minutes to have just the right beautiful purple light at the background. Then, when it was exactly right, the rider took off, nailed the jump, and we got our shot.

Yup, they sure did.


See more of Christoph’s images at his website.

Learn more about the B1 here.


Climbing To a Higher Level With TTL

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Sports Photography

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Set to TTL Mode, the B1 Off-Camera Flash will automatically provide you with a perfect exposure in a flash. Use TTL to shoot fast, to capture constantly moving subjects or simply to be able to fully concentrate on what happens in front of the camera. Like Maneki Neko did.

“Engin Türker is quite unique,” replies photographer Maneki Neko when asked about his athletic, wall-scaling subject. “Besides being a model, he is also a climbing instructor.

“So the idea behind this shoot was to show Engin’s physical appearance in the most raw and fierce aspect possible. For this reason, I told him to focus on his climbing and not worry about posing to the camera. But this presented a bit of challenge for my team and me. Engin moved quickly, and we had to do struggle to follow him with our lights! In fact, I think the shoot would’ve been almost impossible without TTL.”

This was the first time you put an Air Remote TTL-N on your Nikon camera and used the B1 Off-Camera Flash in TTL Mode. What did you think of it?

“The TTL capability really shines in a situation like this. It’s very difficult to get the correct exposure when you are shooting a moving subject. So leaving this task to TTL Mode is really liberating. It allows you to fully concentrate on the subject.”

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Man on Wire. Flash in Face. Chasm Below.

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Sports Photography

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© Andrew Bylon

© Andrew Bydlon

What do you do if you have a friend who strings lines across mountain chasms and walks across? Do you tell him to please stop? Or do you put a 500Ws flash in his face while he is walking across? Andrew Bydlon did the latter. And the result looks pretty darn cool. 

Remember this? If not, here is the short version: On August 11, 2014, we announced the release of Air Remote TTL-N – the clever little divide that allows Nikon shooters to do TTL with the B1 Off-Camera Flash.

To celebrate its release, we asked you guys to pitch us your best idea for a shoot, and promised to send whoever came up with the most exciting idea a B1 and an Air Remote TTL-N. That someone turned out to be outdoor photographer Andrew Bydlon. Andrew wanted to shoot his friend Scott walking across a line stringed across a mountain chasm. But to do so, he needed something portable yet really powerful. And that he got.

Now, Andrew has done his shoot and returned to us with some pretty stunning shots and a short story about the shoot, both if which you will find below.

When you are done reading his story, head over to The Caveman Collective for more jaw dropping cool outdoor shots. Read More

Blair Bunting Show Us How to Light a Football Player

Written by Rebecca Ahremark on . Posted in Sports Photography

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Blair Bunting Show Us How to Light a Football Player-Blair Bunting ASU 1

©Blair Bunting

Being an established advertising photographer and a Nikon and Maurice Lacroix Ambassador, Blair Bunting sure knows how to light. In a recent blog post, titled How to Light a Football Player, Blair shares some of that knowledge.

“Let’s talk about lighting, specifically for mood,” writes Blair on his blog. “The eye finds discomfort and intimidation in the unknown and the unknown is where the light is not. The approach to making a subject intimidating should not be a mass of lights cranked to 11, but a single focus of direction where one light dominates and the remaining support the fear. An example of this that I shot a while back is this portrait of a football player.”

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How Tim Kemple Uses High Speed Flash Sync (1/1600s) to Create Amazing Action Shots

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Sports Photography

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©Tim Kemple

Did you know that using Profoto flashes with a Phase One camera allows you to shoot with flash sync speeds as fast as 1/1600s? Tim Kemple certainly knows it. And he has used that knowledge to create some pretty amazing action shots. Keep reading and learn how.

Tim Kemple got into photography almost by accident. Back in the days, he and his friends were into rock climbing and skiing. They travelled all over the US and even crossed the Atlantic to live out their passion. After doing so for a while, Tim realized that they should probably document their extravagant trips. So he picked up a camera, started shooting his friends in action, and the rest is, as they say, history.

Fast-forward a couple of years, and Tim is a sought-after sports and action photographer. But the things he learned back then is as useful today as it was then.

“When you’re on a shoot and the athlete realizes that you actually get what they’re doing, everything changes,” he says. “At that point the shoot becomes a collaboration. They get inspired to elevate what they do, jump higher or run faster or whatever it may be, which in turn inspires you as a photographer to elevate what you do.”


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