How to Use Backlight to Photograph Glassware

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Product Photography

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How to use backlight to photograph glassware Taka Kawachi 1 600x382 How to Use Backlight to Photograph Glassware

©Taka Kawachi

The awesome photography site Popular Photography has an ongoing article series called How To, in which photographers are interviewed about the different lighting techniques they use to achieve different effects.

The latest article highlights an ambitious shoot done by New York-based product photographer Taka Kawachi and how he used backlight to photograph glassware for a department store chain.

“For two solid weeks in 2012, Taka Kawachi, a product specialist who works out of a studio in Nyack, NY, shot nothing but glassware for a major department store chain,” writes Peter Kolonia. “Juice, highball, and shot glasses, tumblers, stemware of every size and shape, and, yes, pilsner glasses and beer mugs. If he wasn’t a master of lighting glass at the project’s outset, he certainly was by its end.”

Head over to the Popular Photography site for the full story.

Nature Photographer Jasper Doest’s First Experience with the B1 Off-camera Flash

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Animal photography

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Nature Photographer Jasper Doests First Experience with the B1 Off camera Flash 1 600x399 Nature Photographer Jasper Doests First Experience with the B1 Off camera Flash

©Jasper Doest

Fashion photographers, commercial photographers, product photographers – they all shoot with flash. Amongst nature photographers, on the other hand, the use of flash is less widespread.  But Jasper Doest shoots with flash. And he just tried the Profoto B1 off-camera flash. Here is what he has to say of it, in his own words:  

In the field of nature photography, there’s still some hesitance against the use of artificial light sources. I don’t agree with this. Just as long as you use your flash in an appropriate way.

Try to practice balancing the light on a stuffed animal or a human model. You’ll notice that if you point your flash directly at your model at full power he or she is not going to be happy. It could even cause temporarily eye damage. So be careful with this. Another reason why you do not want to do this is that it creates very harsh flat light. Artificial light is meant to control the quality of light, not as a compensation for lack of light quantity. When you learn how to control the quantity and to balance the light from the right angles you will find that using a flash unit in a natural environment does not cause any problems for you and the welfare of the animals.

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Breed’s & Bogdan Morozovskiy’s Profoto B1 Video Review: “The Profoto B1 is a must have.”

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Review

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Breeeds Bogdan Morozovskiys Profoto B1 Video Review 1 Breeds & Bogdan Morozovskiys Profoto B1 Video Review: The Profoto B1 is a must have.

©Dana Pennington

Breed is a website dedicated to providing up-and-coming fashion photographers with the right tools and knowledge to make it to the top. This includes doing reviews of the latest and greatest gear to hit the market. Their lastest review? A Profoto B1 video review.

Breed’s Profoto B1 video review is best described as a conversation between two photographers who have both tried and tested the B1 in the field.

“I’m not a gear junkie,” writes Breed writer Dana Pennington. “But when Profoto announced the B1, I knew it was going to be a game changer. It is.”

“Definitely something in a completely new league of lighting,” adds his friend and photographer Bogdan Morozovskiy, who did a field of the B1 in the desert east of Los Angeles.

Click here to watch the full review at the Breed website.

Walk Through a Wedding, Part 9: Shooting the Reception Details in a Time Crunch

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Wedding Photography

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Walk Through a Wedding is a yearlong video series in which we get to follow wedding photographers Justin & Mary Marantz as they set out to capture a young couple’s most special day.

The series consists of 20 videos. Each video reveals the story and the lighting setup behind a certain image. In this episode, Justin & Mary share some tips and tricks on how to shoot the reception details fast and easy.

“In those situation, it’s absolutely crucial that you have a setup that is both really portable, can give you great light, and also that you don’t have to spend a ton of time dial in the settings,” says Mary Marantz. “With the B1 and the TTL function, we can move really quickly, shoot a lot of different angles, and we don’t have to spend too much time with our camera, changing the settings.”

Previous episodes of Walk Through a Wedding can be found here. The next video will be released on July 21.

 

 Walk Through a Wedding, Part 9: Shooting the Reception Details in a Time Crunch

©Justin & Mary

“The Light Shaper” Battles the Forces of Nature with Flashes and Collapsible Reflectors

Written by Andrea Belluso on . Posted in The Light Shaper

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Andrea Belluso is an experienced photographer with more than three decades in the business. Once a month, Andrea takes us behind the scenes of a recent shoot to share some of the knowledge he has gained over the years. Today, we join him on a challenging on-location shoot where the forces of nature seem to conspire against him.

There are days when the whole world seems to smile upon you. But there are also days when the forces of nature seem to conspire against you. This shoot belongs in the latter category…

The shoot was done at Långtora Airfield outside Stockholm, which is the airfield where my gliding club is based. The look we were going for was a modern version of the flying ladies of the 1940s. Quite a few of the classic Hollywood stars flew gliders. The particular glider we were borrowing for this shoot was used by the Danish air force during the 1940s to train fighter pilots. Some people at the club claim that the gilder was once flown by Greta Garbo. But that fact is still to be verified…

Lighting-wise, we planned to shoot with sunlight and Collapsible Reflectors only. I wanted a subtle and natural backlight in the images, and Collapsible Reflectors are great for that. The fact that Profoto offer ten different Collapsible Reflectors in six fabrics (black, white, silver, sunsilver, gold and translucent) would be helpful, as that allowed us to create different light characters and moods by simply replacing one Collapsible Reflector with another.

That was the plan. But as it turned, the forces of nature refused to cooperate. Read More