Portrait Photographer Stephanie Diani Puts Celebrities in a Different Light

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Portrait Photography

Bookmark and Share
© Stephanie Diani

© Stephanie Diani/Global Assignment Getty Images

Stephanie Diani draws inspiration from some of the greatest, most renowned portrait photographers the world has ever known. But rather than recreating their work, she channels the inspiration to create something that is uniquely hers. Here is how she does it.

Meet Stephanie Diani, a portrait photographer born and bred in LA, recently relocated from the sunny west coast to what is possibly the world’s busiest marketplace for photographers: New York City.

Like many other photographers in her generation, Stephanie is mostly self-taught. She looked at classic portraits by auteurs such as of Richard Avedon, Irving Penn, Helmut Newton, Alex Webb and Henri Cartier-Bresson. She tried to figure out how they did it, and then she tried to do it herself. Finally, she applied that knowledge to create something uniquely her own.

“Arresting,” says Stephanie. “If I could use only one word to describe what it is I try to achieve, that would be the word – arresting.”

Read More

Muse Muse Travels Light Through Europe With the B1 Off-Camera Flash

Written by Sasha Hallin on . Posted in Off-camera Flash, Videos

Bookmark and Share

Wedding photographer Muse Muse travels from Hong Kong to the Swiss Alps to the carnivals in Venice and further on to Paris with a B1 Off-Camera Flash and a Magnum Reflector as his most trusted traveling companions. Join him on his trip in this beautiful, sun kissed video.

A lot of people have welcomed the concept of traveling light. Using Profoto, you could say that Muse Muse is one of them.

Equipment-wise, the Hong-Kong based wedding photographer brought nothing but his Canon camera, an Air Remote TTL-C and a B1 Off-Camera Flash with a Magnum Reflector with him on his trip through Europe. This lightweight lighting solution allowed him to travel with ease all the way from his hometown to the bright sun at 2,300 m above sea level in Switzerland, with a pit stop on a volcano cliff sunset in Santorini, further on to shooting mysterious masquerades in the shadowed alleys of Venice without any hassle, eventually ending up shooting young couples in the city of love – Paris.

Read More

Blair Bunting Uses High-Speed Sync to Shoot a Jaw-Droppingly Stunning Super Bowl Commercial

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Commercial Photography

Bookmark and Share

Curious to know how Blair Bunting created his jaw-droppingly stunning Super Bowl commercial? We can give you a hint. The B1 and Profoto High-Speed Sync was involved. Keep reading to learn the rest.

Blair Bunting, award-winning commercial photographer based in Phoenix, Arizona, has blown our minds more than once. But this time he took things to a whole new level.

Using B1 Off-Camera Flashes upgraded with the recently released High-Speed Sync upgrade, Blair shot super sharp still images that was layered and fused in post production to create a moving still image (if that makes sense).

The effect is reminiscent of slowmotion video, but with the clarity and detail of a still image.

Blair calls the effect parallax.

“What is parallax?” he asks on his blog. “Think of when you were in grade school and you had to do one of those cheesy plays where every parent in the audience thinks that his or her child should be in search of a talent agency because they memorized 23 words and did not faint on stage. Sorry, got distracted there. Anyway, there is always a part in that play where some kid is on a boat made of a tricycle and cardboard, and they are in the rough ocean. In order to create this imaginary ocean in the elementary school cafeteria, they use whats called parallax. This is where they have on set of blue waves on a stick in front of the kid and one behind. The movement of these waves back and forth creates in your mind the idea of the ocean.”

Read More

Alexia Sinclair Is Back With a New Photo Series Titled Rococo

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Fine Art Photography

Bookmark and Share

Frequent readers of our blog know that we are big fans of Australian fine art photographer Alexia Sinclair‘s vivid, colourful and often flower clad imagination. So, naturally we are happy to have her back.

Alexia’s latest series is titled Rococo and features images inspired by, well, Rococo. “Following the design aesthetic of this period, the series is sensual, playful and flamboyant,” says Alexia.

The series features both still life images and the kind of intrinsically detailed portraits Alexia is known for, all lit with Profoto Pro packs. In addition, Alexia filmed a short video on the same theme.

You’ll find a few images below. The video is above.

Head over to Alexia’s website to see the rest and to be honest slightly NSFW images.

Also, there is an interview with her at 500px that you might want to check out.

Read More

Jeffery Salter Shoots Dancers At Bahia Honda Rail Bridge

Written by Rebecca Ahremark on . Posted in Videos

Bookmark and Share

Jeffery Salter is as passionate about his personal projects as he is about his commercial jobs. For this project, for example, he brought two dancers to Bahia Honda Rail Bridge to explore the relationship between people and beautiful architecture.

Jeffery Salter describes his photographic style as “cinematic with a touch of whimsy.” He draws inspiration from surreal artists, mostly painters, and from the cinema. “I keep my eyes open even when I don’t have a camera with me,” he says.

Jeffery, who has travelled the 127 mile long road in the Florida Keys many times, is fascinated by the Key Bridges – a series of bridges which connect the forty-three islands. He had since long wanted to do a personal project about them. Now was the time.

“Its combination of structural strength and graphic lines create a surreal sense of beauty,” replies Jeffery, when asked what is so special about the old Bahia Honda Rail bridge. “It’s magnificent in sheer functionally. You know, it has withstood extreme weather conditions, even hurricanes,” he explains.

The idea behind the project was to put the bridge’s long lasting grandeur and strong graphic lines in contrast with the fleeting moment of grace and soft curves of a dancer. “I wanted to marry the lines in the bridges to the lines of the human form,” he says.

Read More