The Story Behind the Accidential Yet Award-winning Portrait of the Queen of Sweden

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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The Story Behind the Accidential Yet Award winning Portrait of the Queen of SwedenSTOR  MG 0164 600x900 The Story Behind the Accidential Yet Award winning Portrait of the Queen of Sweden

©Rickard L. Eriksson

Rickard L. Eriksson was asked to take the Queen of Sweden’s portrait. Doing so, Rickard accidentally managed to catch the Queen off guard and got an award-winning portrait in the process. Keep reading for the full story.

Queen Silvia of Sweden recently celebrated her seventieth birthday. The anniversary was to be commemorated by a lavish tabletop book, documenting the Queen’s life as a professional woman. The book would, of course, feature portraits of the Queen – portraits that Rickard L. Eriksson was asked to shoot.

“My first thought was to create images that felt natural yet styled,” says Rickard. “Differently put, I wanted the images to feel documentary yet royal. However, getting that documentary feel is easier said than done when working with royalty. In most cases you’re allowed very little time to do your job, which means you’ll most likely end up with a formal portrait of a posing person. But in this case I was lucky enough to spend some time with the Queen. I believe this created a much more relaxed and personal vibe on the shoot.” Read More

Free Webinar with Jared Platt: How to Create Dramatic Night Portraits

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Webinars

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Profoto Free Webinar Dramatic Night Portraits 1 Free Webinar with Jared Platt: How to Create Dramatic Night Portraits

©Jared Platt

Our next webinar, titled Dramatic Night Portraits, will be broadcasted on June 18. Join us and photographer Jared Platt as we bring two B1 off-camera flashes and a selection of Light Shaping Tools into the night to take some dramatic portraits of piano rock star Kevin Burdick.

“Without the use of the sun, just two lights can be a little tricky to get the shot just right,” says Jared. “But I wanted to keep our gear limited to what we could carry between my assistant and myself. So we loaded up with the B1 Location Kit, a few stands and some Light Shaping Tools and headed out into the night.

Join us on June 18 at 7PM CET (June 18 at 10AM Los Angeles, 1PM New York, 6PM London, 7PM Paris // June 19 at 1AM Beijing, 2AM Tokyo, 3AM Sydney) to learn how he got his shots.

Click the link below and sign up, and we’ll send you a reminder when the webinar is about to start!

 

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While Most Photographers Try to Stop the Kids from Doing Silly Faces, Greg Koch Pushes Them to Do Even Sillier

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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Profoto Greg Koch 1 While Most Photographers Try to Stop the Kids from Doing Silly Faces, Greg Koch Pushes Them to Do Even Sillier

©Greg Koch

If you’ve ever tried photographing kids, you’re no stranger to silly faces. But while most of us who put these shots in the drawer, San Fransisco-based photographer Greg Koch saves and frames the silly faces only. 

“When I initially approached my son’s school with the idea of doing a photo project for their art class, I hadn’t yet realized the concept of silly faces,” says Greg Koch. “I only knew I wanted to do a studio shoot. I had just purchased a Profoto Pro-B4 pack and was eager to test it before a couple of client shoots I had the following week.

“When preparing for the shoot in the studio with my son, I kept trying to get a smile out of him.  He, in turn, kept making silly faces.  That’s when inspiration struck. Why should I try to get all of these kids to do something as unnatural as posing?  Wouldn’t it be better to shoot them with all their natural charisma and energy?  The idea felt very natural and I decided to push forward with it. The Silly Faces project was born.”

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On Location Portrait Photography at the Back of the Stage

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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 On Location Portrait Photography at the Back of the Stage

©Adam Krause

On location portrait photography often requires intuitive thinking and fast decisions. But Adam Krause’s portrait of playwright Kwame Kwei-Armah is evidence that doesn’t have to be a bad thing.

New York-based portrait photographer Adam Krause was asked to photograph playwright Kwame Kwei-Armah at the Center Stage in Baltimore, where Kwei-Armah is the Creative Director. The images were to be published together with an upcoming magazine article, but as Adam did not know the angle of the article, he decided to go for a strong portrait that tied together Kwei-Armah with the theatre.

This meant that Adam had to shoot on location. Things were further complicated by the fact that he had only 30 minutes with Kwei-Armah to get his shot. “The biggest challenge was the lack of time,” says Adam. “Since this was an out-of-town shoot, we didn’t have enough time to arrive the day before, do a location scout, and come up with a game plan. So the very second we arrived at the location and brought in our equipment, we had to think as sharply as possible!”

 

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How to Make a Dirty Car Shine Like a Winner

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Commercial Photography

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 How to Make a Dirty Car Shine Like a Winner

Most of us associate car photography with chrome and meticulously polished metal. But the Porsche GT that Richard Dole shot had just won a 24-hour long Daytona race and was far from clean. It was covered in dirt and grit. Keep reading to learn how he got his shot.

The 24 Hours of Daytona is a 24-hour sports car endurance race held annually at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida. Needless to say, the 24-hour long race takes its toll on the racecars. By the time they cross the finishing line, they are covered in dirt and grit.

This year, a Porsche GT from CORE Autosport in Rock Hill, South Carolina, was the first car to cross the finishing line. This car was also the one photographer Richard Dole was asked to shoot on behalf of RACER Magazine.

“This was an unusual assignment,” says Richard. “They wanted me to photograph the car still covered with the dirt, oil, rubber, grease and grime accumulated from the race. And it had to be photographed not in a studio, but in the winning team’s race shop.”

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