Mike Hagen’s B1 & Air Remote TTL-N Review: “This is exciting news for Nikon shooters.”

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Review

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On September 15, we will release Air Remote TTL-N, a clever little device that allows Nikon shooters to do TTL with the B1 off-camera flash. But the first Air Remote TTL-N review has already seen the light of day. It’s Mike Hagen of Nikonian fame who has tested it. And he is pretty impressed.

As the CEO of Visual Adventures and the Managing Director of the Nikonians Academy, Mike Hagen is a well-known name amongst Nikon shooters.

Mike also reviews gear that is of interest to Nikon shooters. Latest in line is an Air Remote TTL-N review which also includes a review of the recently released B1 Location Kit.

Mike starts off by announcing that “this is exciting news for Nikon shooters.” He then brings the remote and the kit to an on-location shoot for a test drive. Finally, he rounds off his review stating:

“Profoto has created a high quality, powerful and easy to use location lighting system that I’d take anywhere. The B1 AirTTL flashes were truly a joy to use and I highly recommend them for any pro shooter who wants the best.”

Head over to Visual Adventures’ website for the full review.

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How to Shoot with TTL When the Weather Keeps Changing

Written by Jared Platt on . Posted in Lighting Tips

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0065 Jared Platt Profoto 600x400 How to Shoot with TTL When the Weather Keeps Changing

©Jared Platt

On September 17, Profoto and photographer Jared Platt will host a free webinar on how to shoot with TTL when the sun comes in and out of the clouds. To get you in the mood for the webinar, Jared has written an article on the topic. Enjoy!

Although I learned flash in a completely manual world, complete with light meters and distance charts, TTL (Through The Lens) flash metering has been around for a while now. We have come to expect it on any on camera flash and with the help of radio and infrared, some companies have even taken the TTL metering off camera.

Basically, TTL technology allows the camera and the flash to have a conversation about the appropriate power of the flash for any given exposure. Not all TTL systems are excellent at this, but the Profoto B1 off-camera flash and the Air Remote TTL-C (for Canon) and the Air Remote TTL-N (for Nikon) do a fantastic job communicating with the camera and come up with very accurate results.

On September 15, 2014, Profoto is releasing Air Remote TTL-N for Nikon, so we took it on location with a Nikon D800 and two B1 off-camera flashes for a 100% TTL photo shoot on location in the desert lakes of Arizona.

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Louis Pang Shoots Against the Shanghai Skyline

Written by Louis Pang on . Posted in On location

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Louis Pang is an international, award-winning photographer based in Malaysia. For this shoot, however, he changed the tropics for the mighty Putong skyline in Shanghai. Here is the full story in Louis’ own words. 

Winter in Shanghai is cold, humid and windy, a tough combination for someone who live in the tropics. A teaching gig brought me to Shanghai, and I would not pass up the opportunity to shoot in the Paris of the East – winter or no winter. My friends in Shanghai pulled some major strings to get Rose, a professional model from Beijing, to jet into Shanghai for the shoot. We started at 7am, thinking it would be wise to avoid the peak hour traffic and crowd.

First stop, the Bund which oversees the famous Putong skyline that is synonymous with Shanghai. Security personnel wanted us off the area because we didn’t have prior approval to shoot there. I have Gao Feng, a fantastic wedding photographer in Shanghai, to thank for convincing them to let us shoot just “10 minutes”. We left the Bund after many “10 minutes”.

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How to Adjust Ambient Light to Work in Your Favour

Written by Drew Gurian on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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20140723 Ethan Leinwand 0059 2 600x400 How to Adjust Ambient Light to Work in Your Favour

©Drew Gurian

Drew Gurian is a young, up-and-coming portrait photographer based in Brooklyn, New York. Each month, he’ll be bringing you a behind the scene perspective, navigating the freelance marketplace of one of the busiest photo markets in the world – New York City. This is the second part of his story, in which he shares some advice on how to adjust ambient light to work in your favour.

Although I grew up just outside of the city in northern New Jersey, until January, I had never actually lived in the city.  Sure, I’ve spent tons of time here over the years, but I really enjoy being able to consider myself a New Yorker for the first time in my life.

I moved here for a few reasons.  It’s one of the largest markets in the world, which means that there’s always room to grow and evolve as a photographer.  I’m surrounded by tons of other creatives who inspire me, and I’m now right in the middle of this thriving community.  Being here also enables me to be around these friends more, meet tons of new people, and sooner or later, it will lead to new work.

Part of being in the midst of this very social scene includes finding a great local bar. Back in January, I was introduced to The Manhattan Inn, which has quickly become one of my favorite bar/restaurants.  Several nights a week, they have someone playing piano in the back room, and I absolutely love the atmosphere.

One performer in particular, Ethan Leinwand, used to play there every Friday and Saturday night.  His self-described style as a preservationist/blues/boogie-woogie player was the perfect fit for this place, and I went to see him play anytime I was in the city on a weekend.  His vintage look was seamless with the music he played, and I knew I needed to photograph him.

We exchanged cards, and after a few months or trying to align schedules, we finally made it happen a couple of weeks back.

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Walk Through a Wedding, Part 13: Shooting the Wedding Dance

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Wedding Photography

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Walk Through a Wedding is a yearlong video series on wedding photography, in which we follow Justin & Mary Marantz as they set out to capture a young couple’s most special day.

The series consists of 20 videos. Each video reveals the story and the lighting setup behind a certain image. In the thirteenth episode, Justin & Mary talk about how they capture the lucky couple’s dance.

“We said: what if we could get images from the guests perspective, as if the photographer wasn’t even there that day, but also, at the same time, get images that those guest could never get,” says Mary.

So how do they do that? Well, the short answer is that they put a powerful flash in off to the side of the room and a diffuser, so that they get a soft and even light spread that blends nicely with the ambient light.

Click play to dive a bit more into the details.

Previous episodes of Walk Through a Wedding can be found here. The next video will be released on September 15.

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