How Michael Mueller Keeps His Cool at -20°c

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Sports Photography

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© Michael Mueller

© Michael Mueller

So you think your last shoot was challenging? Well, try shooting on top of a snowy alpine summit in -20°C with screaming winds, occasional fog and clouds with snowfall. That’s what Michael Mueller did. 

“The client wanted images in the same style as car ads,” says Michael Mueller – fearless photographer and dauntless adventurer in equal measures. “They wanted clean, super perfect images with blue skies and white mountain tops. Being a brand for serious athletes, it was also important that the images showed a real challenge. We couldn’t make it easy for ourselves. We had to climb high and shoot real athletes doing real things.”

Said and done. Michael and his team packed their bags and went to Pontresina in the Swiss Alps. With them they brought B1 Off-Camera Flashes, TeleZoom Reflectors and Zoom Reflectors.

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Matt Korinek Tries Profoto HSS In Three Different Situations

Written by Rebecca Ahremark on . Posted in Sports Photography

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© Matt Korinek

© Matt Korinek

Being a fitness photographer, Matt Korinek sometimes needs to shoot in difficult conditions that requires shorter flash duration than the so-called x-sync, typically 1/250 of a second. He was then of course extra excited when we released HSS for his Profoto B1 Off-Camera Flash. Matt decided to try it out in three different situations. 

First off, a shoot up on the roof of a local parking garage. Matt wanted to get a good look of how the system would operate in full sun.

“As you can see, the flash makes a big difference in the scene while still keeping it realistic.”, Matt writes and compares the two images seen below.

“The Profoto HSS system was up to the task and I didn’t see any banding that you would usually see if you exceed your camera’s flash sync speed limit. The TTL system also worked as advertised and provided an acceptable exposure.”

“The biggest benefit was that I could shoot at high shutter speeds fast enough to capture action and add artificial light to give the image a more premium look.”, he continues.

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Andrew Hancock Travels Light With the New Profoto B2 to Vatnajökull Glacier

Written by Rebecca Ahremark on . Posted in Sports Photography

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© Andrew Hancock

© Andrew Hancock

Photographer Andrew Hancock has made his living being on the road and on location. He is always up for the challenge when it comes to finding new exciting places to visit. For most of his trips, Andrew is used to travelling with heavy and bulking equipment. This trip to Island was different. Why? He had brought the new and lightweight Profoto B2 Off-Camera Flash with him.

The trip to the Vatnajökull Glacier wasn’t going to be easy. The weather was brutal with hard winds and shut down roads. But Andrew and his team knew they had to get the shot regardless of the weather.

“I like a proper challenge and I really was curious to see how the B2 would perform in the elements,” writes Andrew on his blog. “Additionally, the windows to shoot the two portraits were the two last shoot days of the trip.”

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Christoph Jorda Lights Up an Ice Cave

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Sports Photography

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Profoto-B1-Off-Camera-Flash-Pitztal-Matthias-Jorda

© Christoph Jorda

We don’t have any behind-the-scenes images to share from this shoot. And we honestly don’t know very much abou it. Still, this image is just too good not to share.

What we do know is that it was shot by German photographer Christoph Jorda. We know that he used a Profoto B1. And we know that the ice cave was not put in the image in post. It  was shot just the way it looks.

“This ice cave is a hidden jewel at about 3000 meter altitude in the middle of the Pitzal Glacier ski resort, says Christoph. “We hiked up there, two riders, one photographer, two B1s and a lot motivation.”

Once they reached the ice cave, Christoph and his team spent about an hour digging in the mountain side. They wanted the ice cave’s opening to be larger (so that more of the background would be visible). They also wanted the landing hill to be lower (to make the jump higher).

“After we were done, the two riders climbed on top of the cave,” says Christoph. “One of them prepared for the  jump. The other was holding one of the two B1s, which would be used as our main light on the guy doing the jump. Meanwhile, I set up the other B1 inside the cave. I wanted to show the smooth surface of the ice and the deep blue color of the cave. The best way to do that is to have a backlight.

“After a couple of test shots we were ready and good to go. We then had to wait for about 10minutes to have just the right beautiful purple light at the background. Then, when it was exactly right, the rider took off, nailed the jump, and we got our shot.

Yup, they sure did.

 

See more of Christoph’s images at his website.

Learn more about the B1 here.

 

Climbing To a Higher Level With TTL

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Sports Photography

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Set to TTL Mode, the B1 Off-Camera Flash will automatically provide you with a perfect exposure in a flash. Use TTL to shoot fast, to capture constantly moving subjects or simply to be able to fully concentrate on what happens in front of the camera. Like Maneki Neko did.

“Engin Türker is quite unique,” replies photographer Maneki Neko when asked about his athletic, wall-scaling subject. “Besides being a model, he is also a climbing instructor.

“So the idea behind this shoot was to show Engin’s physical appearance in the most raw and fierce aspect possible. For this reason, I told him to focus on his climbing and not worry about posing to the camera. But this presented a bit of challenge for my team and me. Engin moved quickly, and we had to do struggle to follow him with our lights! In fact, I think the shoot would’ve been almost impossible without TTL.”

This was the first time you put an Air Remote TTL-N on your Nikon camera and used the B1 Off-Camera Flash in TTL Mode. What did you think of it?

“The TTL capability really shines in a situation like this. It’s very difficult to get the correct exposure when you are shooting a moving subject. So leaving this task to TTL Mode is really liberating. It allows you to fully concentrate on the subject.”

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