Posts Tagged ‘AcuteB2’

The Difficult Thing About Finding Portrait Subjects Amongst 100 Million People

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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Profoto AcuteB2 MaxRiche KumbhMela 08 600x449 The Difficult Thing About Finding Portrait Subjects Amongst 100 Million People

©Max Riche

Max Riche traveled to Kumbh Mela, the largest pilgrimage in the world, to shoot some portraits. Needless to say, he had no problem finding subjects. But there were other challenges.

You might not know what Kumbh Mela is, but a lot of people sure do. And when we say a lot, we do mean a lot. Kumbh Mela is namely the Hindu’s most important pilgrimage, considered to be the largest peaceful gathering in the world. More than 100 million people participate and bathe together in one of the four sacred rivers in India. Last year, the number of participants hit an all-time high, making it the largest gathering in the history of mankind. In other words, a photographer looking for subjects had no trouble finding them.

Enter Max Riche, advertising and editorial photographer based in Paris and Montréal. Max was at Kumbh Mela last year. Now, what was a French advertising and editorial photographer doing shooting portraits in India you might ask?

“On the side of my advertising work, I’ve always kept a body of personal work growing,” he says. “I think it’s important to keep doing work that matters to you from a personal standpoint. This was such a project. Read More

Mark Wallace’s Lighting Tips for Shooting On-location at Mid-day

Written by Mark Wallace on . Posted in Lighting Tips

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Mark Wallaces Lighting Tips for Shooting on Location in mid day Mark Wallaces Lighting Tips for Shooting On location at Mid day

©Mark Wallace

Shooting portraits on-location can give you terrific results. If the light is right things are a snap, but what happens when we have less than ideal conditions? With a bit of knowledge, and the right tools, you can even shoot outside at almost any time of day. A few months ago I was faced with a challenge. I needed to shoot a portrait using soft light the harsh desert light at mid-day. The light was absolutely horrible. Here’s how I tackled the issues.

 

Step One: Control the Ambient Light.

Screen Shot 2014 01 10 at 9.35.22 PM 600x358 Mark Wallaces Lighting Tips for Shooting On location at Mid day

The first thing I do when shooting on-location is to control the ambient light as much as possible. In this scenario I was shooting in an area with no shade at all. I set up a large translucent umbrella to shade my model. This softened the light and also took my exposure on the model down by about one stop. You can see in this photo that my model is in shade but the background is still in the sun.

I used my light meter to find the correct exposure for the background. In my test shot you can see that the background is exposed properly but my model is underexposed. An underexposed model means I would be able to use my flash to shape the light hitting her. This was shot at ISO 100, 1/200 @ f/11. Read More

Brent Lewin Brings his Flash Pack to the World’s Largest Camel Fair

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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Profoto AcuteB2 flash pack Brent Lewin 06 600x400 Brent Lewin Brings his Flash Pack to the World’s Largest Camel Fair

©Brent Lewin/Redux

Brent Lewin is a documentary photographer whose images can be seen in publications such as National Geographic, New York Times and Newsweek. Based in Hong Kong now as a staff photographer with Bloomberg, Brent’s driving spirit is his curiosity. He wants to explore and meet new people, learn their stories and share them with the world. Here is one such story, shot and written by Brent himself.

These portraits were shot in India’s Rajasthan state during the Pushkar camel mela. Each year at the time of the Kartik Purnima full moon, up to 20,000 camels descend on the sand dunes surrounding Pushkar to take part in the world’s largest camel fair.

The men in these photos are Rabari, a nomadic community found in Rajasthan and Gujarat whose identity, going back to the time of creation, is linked to the camel. The story goes that the goddess Parvati created a 5-legged animal out of clay that resembled a cow. She asked her husband Shiva to give life to the animal but he remarked that it looked odd and wasn’t practical. So he took the fifth leg and pushed it upwards through the body so there was a bump on the top of the torso. The hump on a camel is believed to be the top of the leg. If you look at the underside of the camel they have a small-calloused bump that looks like a foot, which is believed to be the foot of the leg poking out. After life was given to the camel Parvati asked who would care for this animal. So Shiva rubbed his chest and used his dried skin to make a small puppet. He mixed some milk from the banyan tree with the puppet and it was given life and this is how the Rabari were created. Read More

Neil van Niekerk Shoots a Vintage Motorbike in an Alley

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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Profoto Blog Neil van Niekerk NV2 5812 vintage Neil van Niekerk Shoots a Vintage Motorbike in an Alley

©Neil van Niekerk

Ok, so it is not the first time we highlight a post on Neil van Niekerk‘s wonderful blog, but as long as he keeps serving us gems such as this, we will happily pass them along to you guys.

This time Neil takes us behind the scenes of a recent shot for his upcoming book on portrait photography 60 Portraits.

“I photographed a few sequences of John and Barbara with this motorbike, using different setups,” writes Neil. “I liked this dramatic series the most, with the light from behind casting a shadow in front of them. I wanted the light to etch the frame of the motorbike and side-car, without revealing too much detail – I wanted this to be a portrait of John and Barbara.”

Neil needed only two lights to achieve this effect: an AcuteB2 equipped with a Magnum Reflector and a D1 equipped with a Softbox RFi 3×4′.

Head over to Neil’s blog to learn how he did it. You won’t regret it.

Chris Gale: Flashes in the Dark

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Videos

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The good people over at Phase One just published a video featuring photographer Chris Gale, who ventured down a disused London Underground station called Aldwych.

Needless to say, working at a disused London Underground station poses a number of challenges. Chris had do the shoot in almost pitch darkness, without any mains power, and he had to wrap up the shoot in only three hours.

The fact that Chris needed to use flashes to fake the tunnel lights posed yet another challenge, as the flash packs had to be placed a couple of hundreds meter away.

“I’m shooting over a comparatively large area, so I need to ensure that I can reliably trigger the flash, ” says Chris. “There are no second chances to get this shot, so I can’t have any problems with
my camera system, software or lighting.

“I’m using six Profoto battery generators. The images will be shot using a Phase One 645DF+ with a Profoto Air Sync on the camera’s hot-shoe. I chose the Air Sync as it should work
on a range of around 300 meters.”

Complete gear list and final image can be found below.

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