Posts Tagged ‘B1’

You Know the B1. Now Meet the Profoto B2. And the Rest of the Family.

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in News

Bookmark and Share

Profoto-Off-Camera-Flash-system-Profoto-B1-Profoto-B2

You know the B1 – the off-camera flash that has been called “game changer” more times than we can count. Today, we present the next step in that evolution. Meet the new Profoto Off-Camera Flash system and the new Profoto B2.

The new Profoto Off-Camera Flash system is designed for fast and easy on-location photography. Everything included in the system is small and lightweight. Everything is easy to use.

The most attention-grabbing item in the system is probably the new Profoto B2. The Profoto B2 is a lighter, more portable counterpart to the B1. The Profoto B2 consists of a battery pack and a head. The battery pack can be put on the shoulder or hip, while the head is small and light enough to be mounted onto a monopod or a bracket on the camera. This will allow the photographer to stay moving. If that is not necessary, both the pack and head can be put on a stand and the Profoto B2 can be wirelessly controlled from the camera. This makes the Profoto B2 the world’s first off-camera flash that can be used both on and off-camera.

Read More

Christoph Jorda Lights Up an Ice Cave

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Sports Photography

Bookmark and Share
Profoto-B1-Off-Camera-Flash-Pitztal-Matthias-Jorda

© Christoph Jorda

We don’t have any behind-the-scenes images to share from this shoot. And we honestly don’t know very much abou it. Still, this image is just too good not to share.

What we do know is that it was shot by German photographer Christoph Jorda. We know that he used a Profoto B1. And we know that the ice cave was not put in the image in post. It  was shot just the way it looks.

“This ice cave is a hidden jewel at about 3000 meter altitude in the middle of the Pitzal Glacier ski resort, says Christoph. “We hiked up there, two riders, one photographer, two B1s and a lot motivation.”

Once they reached the ice cave, Christoph and his team spent about an hour digging in the mountain side. They wanted the ice cave’s opening to be larger (so that more of the background would be visible). They also wanted the landing hill to be lower (to make the jump higher).

“After we were done, the two riders climbed on top of the cave,” says Christoph. “One of them prepared for the  jump. The other was holding one of the two B1s, which would be used as our main light on the guy doing the jump. Meanwhile, I set up the other B1 inside the cave. I wanted to show the smooth surface of the ice and the deep blue color of the cave. The best way to do that is to have a backlight.

“After a couple of test shots we were ready and good to go. We then had to wait for about 10minutes to have just the right beautiful purple light at the background. Then, when it was exactly right, the rider took off, nailed the jump, and we got our shot.

Yup, they sure did.

 

See more of Christoph’s images at his website.

Learn more about the B1 here.

 

Kelly Pratt Uses Profoto B1 to Create Hard Shadows

Written by Rebecca Ahremark on . Posted in Videos

Bookmark and Share

Kelly Pratt, a husband and wife photographic team, had a vision: A vision of a ballet dancer, straight lines and shadows falling across her body. This vision required a large studio space and great lighting techniques. Luckily they had both. 

The team wanted to capture an elegant and modern look and to show off the dancer Vanessa’s grace and strength. With everything they had in mind, they realized that it wouldn’t be easy. First off, to create the lines falling across the wall, they needed to make an 8 foot cookie (a device to cast shadows patterns or silhouettes). They set up their trusted Profoto B1 Off-Camera Flash, and by simply moving it around they were able to change the direction and stretch of the shadows.

To be able to create hard and dramatic shadows they needed to place the flash far away and visualize how the shadows would fall on the dancer. “The modeling light on the B1 was especially helpful for this setup”, writes Kelly.

Read More

Muse Muse Travels Light Through Europe With the B1 Off-Camera Flash

Written by Sasha Hallin on . Posted in Off-camera Flash, Videos

Bookmark and Share

Wedding photographer Muse Muse travels from Hong Kong to the Swiss Alps to the carnivals in Venice and further on to Paris with a B1 Off-Camera Flash and a Magnum Reflector as his most trusted traveling companions. Join him on his trip in this beautiful, sun kissed video.

A lot of people have welcomed the concept of traveling light. Using Profoto, you could say that Muse Muse is one of them.

Equipment-wise, the Hong-Kong based wedding photographer brought nothing but his Canon camera, an Air Remote TTL-C and a B1 Off-Camera Flash with a Magnum Reflector with him on his trip through Europe. This lightweight lighting solution allowed him to travel with ease all the way from his hometown to the bright sun at 2,300 m above sea level in Switzerland, with a pit stop on a volcano cliff sunset in Santorini, further on to shooting mysterious masquerades in the shadowed alleys of Venice without any hassle, eventually ending up shooting young couples in the city of love – Paris.

Read More

Blair Bunting Uses High-Speed Sync to Shoot a Jaw-Droppingly Stunning Super Bowl Commercial

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Commercial Photography

Bookmark and Share

Curious to know how Blair Bunting created his jaw-droppingly stunning Super Bowl commercial? We can give you a hint. The B1 and Profoto High-Speed Sync was involved. Keep reading to learn the rest.

Blair Bunting, award-winning commercial photographer based in Phoenix, Arizona, has blown our minds more than once. But this time he took things to a whole new level.

Using B1 Off-Camera Flashes upgraded with the recently released High-Speed Sync upgrade, Blair shot super sharp still images that was layered and fused in post production to create a moving still image (if that makes sense).

The effect is reminiscent of slowmotion video, but with the clarity and detail of a still image.

Blair calls the effect parallax.

“What is parallax?” he asks on his blog. “Think of when you were in grade school and you had to do one of those cheesy plays where every parent in the audience thinks that his or her child should be in search of a talent agency because they memorized 23 words and did not faint on stage. Sorry, got distracted there. Anyway, there is always a part in that play where some kid is on a boat made of a tricycle and cardboard, and they are in the rough ocean. In order to create this imaginary ocean in the elementary school cafeteria, they use whats called parallax. This is where they have on set of blue waves on a stick in front of the kid and one behind. The movement of these waves back and forth creates in your mind the idea of the ocean.”

Read More