Posts Tagged ‘Mark Wallace’

Mark Wallace on One Light Portraiture

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Lighting Tips

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Hey, sorry we are a little late with this one. But now it is up and running: the recorded video from our webinar on one light portraiture.

Click play, sit back and let Mark Wallace guide you through the many different portrait looks you can achieve with just a single light source. It’s an hour full of tips and tricks and there’s something there for everyone, regardless of style, taste and previous knowledge.

Our next webinar will be held this Wednesday, 19. The subject will be high-key and low-key lighting.

We promise to publish the recorded version of the upcoming webinar  a little faster than this one, but the fastest and most fun way to participate is, of course, to see it live.

Click the link below to sign up, and we’ll send you a friendly reminder when the next one is about to start.

 

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Free Webinar on High-key and Low-Key lighting

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Webinars

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High key and low key lighting Free Webinar on High key and Low Key lighting

©Mark Wallace

In exactly one week’s time we’re doing our fourth webinar with Mark Wallace. This time Mark will show us how to do high-key and low-key lighting.

High-key lighting is great for getting a fresh, fun and upbeat feel to an image. Low-key lighting, on other hand, is great for creating drama and for accentuating the contours of your subject. Knowing your way around these two lighting styles is fundamental for any photographer wanting to create different images with many different feels to them. And that you will after watching this webinar!

Sounds good? Then mark March 19 at 7PM CET (10AM Los Angeles, 1PM New York, 6PM London, 7PM Paris, +2AM Beijing, +3AM Tokyo, +5AM Sydney) in your calendar.

Or even simpler, click the link below and sign up, and we will send you a reminder when the webinar is about to start!

 

Sign up

 

Understanding the Position of Your Light

Written by Mark Wallace on . Posted in Lighting Tips

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Profoto Webinar Mark Wallace Understanding the Position of Your Light Understanding the Position of Your Light

©Mark Wallace

Next week I’ll be teaching another Profoto Webinar. We’ll be looking at the many looks of the 1-light portrait. Learning how to work with a single source of light is critical to becoming an accomplished studio portrait photographer. Working with a single light simplifies things, it removes the distractions of shadows and highlights that are created from other light sources. It allows you to focus on shaping the light using position of light and various Light Shaping Tools. We’ll be covering all of those things in the webinar, but in this article I want to focus on one thing: the position of your light. Read More

The 5 Most Popular Stories on the Profoto Blog in January

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in News

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Profoto Blog popular stories January 1 The 5 Most Popular Stories on the Profoto Blog in January

The 5 most popular stories on the Profoto Blog in January includes breathtaking shots of racing cars, stunt bikes caught midair, ballet dancers shot on location and a Japanese greeting card … with a horse.

How Frederic Schlosser Made a Parked Car Look As If It Is Moving at 150 Km/h

So you have a priceless Porsche race car to photograph for an ad campaign and you have to make it look like it’s driving really fast, but space is tight and you left your stunt driver at home. So how do you get the shot of this car driving fast while parked?

Aaron Conway Dances with the D1

Cincinnati-based fine art and commercial photographer Aaron Conway was challenged to introduce the city’s ballet to a new and younger audience. His solution? Shoot the ensemble dancing in a location where the kids actually hang out.

Mark Wallace’s Lighting Tips for Shooting on Location at Mid Day

Shooting portraits on-location can give you terrific results. If the light is right things are a snap, but what happens when we have less than ideal conditions? With a bit of knowledge, and the right tools, you can even shoot outside at almost any time of day!

Kohsaku Hoshino Catches a Jumping Motorcycle Rider Midair with the B1 Off Camera Flash

We’ve already posted behind-the-scenes videos with the B1 off-camera flash shot in Italy, the US, France and Spain. Now add to that a Japanese video, featuring a jumping motorcycle rider caught midair.

Irwin Wong’s New Year’s Greetings

New Year’s Day postcards are a big thing in Japan. But Tokyo-based photographerIrwin Wong took it further than most, bringing his entire team, a horse and a bunch of B1 off-camera flashes out in the forest.

 

Which one was your favorite? Leave a comment below and we’ll do our best to find more like that!

On Monday we return with a brand new Light Shaping Tool of the Month piece. (Hint: it’s a collapsible tool that ends with “mbrella”.)

Have a great weekend.

Mark Wallace’s Lighting Tips for Shooting On-location at Mid-day

Written by Mark Wallace on . Posted in Lighting Tips

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Mark Wallaces Lighting Tips for Shooting on Location in mid day Mark Wallaces Lighting Tips for Shooting On location at Mid day

©Mark Wallace

Shooting portraits on-location can give you terrific results. If the light is right things are a snap, but what happens when we have less than ideal conditions? With a bit of knowledge, and the right tools, you can even shoot outside at almost any time of day. A few months ago I was faced with a challenge. I needed to shoot a portrait using soft light the harsh desert light at mid-day. The light was absolutely horrible. Here’s how I tackled the issues.

 

Step One: Control the Ambient Light.

Screen Shot 2014 01 10 at 9.35.22 PM 600x358 Mark Wallaces Lighting Tips for Shooting On location at Mid day

The first thing I do when shooting on-location is to control the ambient light as much as possible. In this scenario I was shooting in an area with no shade at all. I set up a large translucent umbrella to shade my model. This softened the light and also took my exposure on the model down by about one stop. You can see in this photo that my model is in shade but the background is still in the sun.

I used my light meter to find the correct exposure for the background. In my test shot you can see that the background is exposed properly but my model is underexposed. An underexposed model means I would be able to use my flash to shape the light hitting her. This was shot at ISO 100, 1/200 @ f/11. Read More