Posts Tagged ‘Pro-7b’

Gregory Heisler Photographs a Crowd of 3.000 People with 3 Profoto Strobes

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Commercial Photography

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Gregory Heisler Photographers 3000 People with Profoto strobes 1 600x450 Gregory Heisler Photographs a Crowd of 3.000 People with 3 Profoto Strobes

©Gregory Heisler

For the one-year anniversary of the bombing at the Boston Marathon, Sports Illustrated did a special cover, including 3.000 Bostonians standing united at the site of the tragic event. American Photo has interviewed the guy who got the shot. His name is Gregory Heisler and here is how he did it.

“It wasn’t a technical kind of picture,” Gregory Heisler tells American Photo’s Stan Horazcek. “It was more about being able to get a response from the crowd.”

There has apparently been some debate regarding if the cover image was lit or not. Horazcek, of course, asks about this. Heisler replies:

“All we used to light up that entire crowd were two Profoto heads. They were battery-powered Pro-7Bs. They’re 1200 watt strobes and we had them powered down to about half-power.”

“I had another light about a half a block away doing the same exact thing on the back half of the crowd,” he then adds. “It wasn’t like I had a main light and a fill light. They were both doing the same thing in different areas.”

Heisler also comments on his choice of Light Shaping Tool, which he describes as “the secret weapon in the Profoto lineup.” Can you guess what it is?

Head over to American Photo’s site for the full story.

On Location Portrait Photography at the Back of the Stage

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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 On Location Portrait Photography at the Back of the Stage

©Adam Krause

On location portrait photography often requires intuitive thinking and fast decisions. But Adam Krause’s portrait of playwright Kwame Kwei-Armah is evidence that doesn’t have to be a bad thing.

New York-based portrait photographer Adam Krause was asked to photograph playwright Kwame Kwei-Armah at the Center Stage in Baltimore, where Kwei-Armah is the Creative Director. The images were to be published together with an upcoming magazine article, but as Adam did not know the angle of the article, he decided to go for a strong portrait that tied together Kwei-Armah with the theatre.

This meant that Adam had to shoot on location. Things were further complicated by the fact that he had only 30 minutes with Kwei-Armah to get his shot. “The biggest challenge was the lack of time,” says Adam. “Since this was an out-of-town shoot, we didn’t have enough time to arrive the day before, do a location scout, and come up with a game plan. So the very second we arrived at the location and brought in our equipment, we had to think as sharply as possible!”

 

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How to Make a Dirty Car Shine Like a Winner

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Commercial Photography

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 How to Make a Dirty Car Shine Like a Winner

Most of us associate car photography with chrome and meticulously polished metal. But the Porsche GT that Richard Dole shot had just won a 24-hour long Daytona race and was far from clean. It was covered in dirt and grit. Keep reading to learn how he got his shot.

The 24 Hours of Daytona is a 24-hour sports car endurance race held annually at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida. Needless to say, the 24-hour long race takes its toll on the racecars. By the time they cross the finishing line, they are covered in dirt and grit.

This year, a Porsche GT from CORE Autosport in Rock Hill, South Carolina, was the first car to cross the finishing line. This car was also the one photographer Richard Dole was asked to shoot on behalf of RACER Magazine.

“This was an unusual assignment,” says Richard. “They wanted me to photograph the car still covered with the dirt, oil, rubber, grease and grime accumulated from the race. And it had to be photographed not in a studio, but in the winning team’s race shop.”

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Watch Simeon Quarrie Make a Young Couple’s Dream Come True

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Wedding Photography

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Some people fantasize about their wedding until the day it occurs. If you’re one of them, Simeon Quarrie might be the wedding photographer you’re looking for. Because his images sure do look like dreams come true. 

His recent series Released by Love is, by no definition, an exception. On the contrary, it shows Simeon take his signature style to a whole new level. By skillfully balancing the ambient light in a meticulously decorated attic with the light from his D1 monolight and Pro-7b pack, Simeon creates a series of images with a soft, dreamlike beauty. As mentioned before, it looks like someone’s fantasy just came true. And judging from the wedding couple’s reaction, that’s exactly what happened.

“Sometimes you have to just seize the opportunity,” says Simeon in regards to the theme. “Take who or what you want, despite the seeming restrictions from friends, family or a past that can act as an obstacle. Tied. Unavailable. Restricted. However, wanting to be released. Hence the title, Released by Love.”

The final images can be seen in the end of the video. But if you want our advice, watch the entire video from start to finish. It is worth every second of your time.

After that, you should check out Simeon’s website.

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Alexander Alexandrov Transforms a Gridded Softbox into a Barred Window

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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Profoto Alexander Alexandrov Sly Vicious 04 600x400 Alexander Alexandrov Transforms a Gridded Softbox into a Barred Window

©Alexander Alexandrov

Portrait photographer Alexander Alexandrov likes somber moods and stories, and he knows how to use lighting to achieve that effect. For instance, he recently made a gridded softbox look like a barred window. Read the story and learn how.

Alexander Alexandrov was born in Voronezh, Russia, but moved to the United States in his late teens. It was here that he discovered his love for photography – for people photography in particular.

“I like to shoot people,” says Alexander. “I wouldn’t say just portraits, but close to that. I like character-driven visual storytelling. Even if it’s a cool location and high fashion wardrobe, the eyes are still “the window to the person’s soul”, as the saying goes.”

In terms of lighting, what would you say is the most important thing to remember as a people photographer?

I think it’s important to always try to do it in a way that doesn’t call attention to it and doesn’t distract but adds to the photograph. Most importantly, if you can understand your setup and it feels right to you and you understand why, then you got it.” Read More