Posts Tagged ‘Pro-B4’

“The Light Shaper” Battles the Forces of Nature with Flashes and Collapsible Reflectors

Written by Andrea Belluso on . Posted in The Light Shaper

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Andrea Belluso is an experienced photographer with more than three decades in the business. Once a month, Andrea takes us behind the scenes of a recent shoot to share some of the knowledge he has gained over the years. Today, we join him on a challenging on-location shoot where the forces of nature seem to conspire against him.

There are days when the whole world seems to smile upon you. But there are also days when the forces of nature seem to conspire against you. This shoot belongs in the latter category…

The shoot was done at Långtora Airfield outside Stockholm, which is the airfield where my gliding club is based. The look we were going for was a modern version of the flying ladies of the 1940s. Quite a few of the classic Hollywood stars flew gliders. The particular glider we were borrowing for this shoot was used by the Danish air force during the 1940s to train fighter pilots. Some people at the club claim that the gilder was once flown by Greta Garbo. But that fact is still to be verified…

Lighting-wise, we planned to shoot with sunlight and Collapsible Reflectors only. I wanted a subtle and natural backlight in the images, and Collapsible Reflectors are great for that. The fact that Profoto offer ten different Collapsible Reflectors in six fabrics (black, white, silver, sunsilver, gold and translucent) would be helpful, as that allowed us to create different light characters and moods by simply replacing one Collapsible Reflector with another.

That was the plan. But as it turned, the forces of nature refused to cooperate. Read More

How to Do a Norman Rockwell Inspired Shoot in the Studio

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Lighting Tips

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 How to Do a Norman Rockwell Inspired Shoot in the Studio

©Joey Carrapichano

The iconic illustrations of American artist Norman Rockwell are a source of inspiration for many photographers. Want some tips and trick for how to create your own Norman Rockwell-inspired shot? Then keep reading, as Joey Carrapichano is about to share what he knows of the subject.

“I’ve always admired Norman Rockwell,” says Joey Carrapichano. “His illustrations are so vivid. The kids in them make the most amazing expressions. These expressions are a great source of inspiration for me. It’s something I try to also capture in my own photographs.”

Traces of Joey’s admiration for the American artist can be found in his own colorful, comic book-like photographs. The image above is a nice example of that. So how did Joey create that shot, you might ask?

For starters, unlike what you might think, the image was not shot on the beach but in Joey’s studio in Hamburg, Germany.

“It often rains here in Hamburg,” says Joey. “That’s why we decided to shoot in the studio and composite the background and the wall in Photoshop. We had a tight deadline and couldn’t risk delays because of bad weather.”

Tight deadlines and limited time frames were also the reasons behind Joey’s decision to shoot one kid at a time.

“I love photographing kids,” he says. “They’re always such a joy to work with. But they do loose interest quickly, which means you have very little time to get your shot. Because of this, I decided to photograph one kid at a time. I already knew what expression I wanted each kid to do, so I just figured it was better to nail one at a time, and then put them all together.

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While Most Photographers Try to Stop the Kids from Doing Silly Faces, Greg Koch Pushes Them to Do Even Sillier

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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Profoto Greg Koch 1 While Most Photographers Try to Stop the Kids from Doing Silly Faces, Greg Koch Pushes Them to Do Even Sillier

©Greg Koch

If you’ve ever tried photographing kids, you’re no stranger to silly faces. But while most of us who put these shots in the drawer, San Fransisco-based photographer Greg Koch saves and frames the silly faces only. 

“When I initially approached my son’s school with the idea of doing a photo project for their art class, I hadn’t yet realized the concept of silly faces,” says Greg Koch. “I only knew I wanted to do a studio shoot. I had just purchased a Profoto Pro-B4 pack and was eager to test it before a couple of client shoots I had the following week.

“When preparing for the shoot in the studio with my son, I kept trying to get a smile out of him.  He, in turn, kept making silly faces.  That’s when inspiration struck. Why should I try to get all of these kids to do something as unnatural as posing?  Wouldn’t it be better to shoot them with all their natural charisma and energy?  The idea felt very natural and I decided to push forward with it. The Silly Faces project was born.”

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How Tim Kemple Uses High Speed Flash Sync (1/1600s) to Create Amazing Action Shots

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Sports Photography

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Profoto Tim Kemple CF001434 600x488 How Tim Kemple Uses High Speed Flash Sync (1/1600s) to Create Amazing Action Shots

©Tim Kemple

Did you know that using Profoto flashes with a Phase One camera allows you to shoot with flash sync speeds as fast as 1/1600s? Tim Kemple certainly knows it. And he has used that knowledge to create some pretty amazing action shots. Keep reading and learn how.

Tim Kemple got into photography almost by accident. Back in the days, he and his friends were into rock climbing and skiing. They travelled all over the US and even crossed the Atlantic to live out their passion. After doing so for a while, Tim realized that they should probably document their extravagant trips. So he picked up a camera, started shooting his friends in action, and the rest is, as they say, history.

Fast-forward a couple of years, and Tim is a sought-after sports and action photographer. But the things he learned back then is as useful today as it was then.

“When you’re on a shoot and the athlete realizes that you actually get what they’re doing, everything changes,” he says. “At that point the shoot becomes a collaboration. They get inspired to elevate what they do, jump higher or run faster or whatever it may be, which in turn inspires you as a photographer to elevate what you do.”

 

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Alexia Sinclair Traveled to a Frozen Castle, Left Untouched for Hundreds of Years, to Shoot Portraits That Will Blow Your Mind

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Fine Art Photography

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Fine art photographer Alexia Sinclair was given the keys to a frozen castle left untouched since the 17th century. “When you’re given such an incredible opportunity, you have to create something equally incredible yourself,” she says. “Otherwise it’s just a failure.” Keep reading and learn how she pulled it off.

It all started with an email from the Royal Palace in Stockholm. The Royal Armory was preparing an exhibition on Queen Christina and wanted to feature the portrait Alexia had done of the flamboyant queen as part of the portrait series The Regal Twelve. Alexia was also invited to the opening ceremony in Stockholm.

Never one to let an opportunity pass, and with a well-documented fascination for kings and queens, Alexia asked the Royal Palace if she could photograph a real-life princess while in Sweden. The reply she got was: “No. But we do have a castle you may use.”

A couple of months later, Alexia arrived at Skokloster Castle – a 17th century Baroque masterpiece situated just outside Stockholm. She had done weeks and weeks of research and planning. She had rallied people from all over Scandinavia willing to travel to Skokloster to style, model and assist. She was now ready to start her brand new portrait series, which was eventually named A Frozen Tale. Read More