Posts Tagged ‘RFi’

The Question that Got Portrait Photographer Rémi Chapeaublanc to Get on a Motorbike and Drive to Mongolia

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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French portrait photographer Rémi Chapeaublanc travelled all the way from Paris to Mongolia, driven by the desire to find the answer to a deceptively simple question: “who is this person standing in front of me?”

“I often end up doing projects which are kind of crazy,” says portrait photographer Rémi Chapeaublanc. And he is not exaggerating. After having his motorcycle license for just two weeks, he packed his camera, an AcuteB2 battery pack, an Air Sync and an RFi soft box, and started driving towards Mongolia.

After he had reached his destination and spent some time with the Mongolian people, an idea started to form in his head. He was going to take their portraits, one by one, with the same process and the same setup. The idea was that by keeping it simple, he would be able to focus on the person in front of the camera, see beyond the surface and ask himself: “who is this person?”

An inspiring ambition and a great testament to the power of portrait photography.

See more of Rémi’s work at his website.

 

Portrait photographer Remi Chapeaublanc gods and beasts 1 600x399 The Question that Got Portrait Photographer Rémi Chapeaublanc to Get on a Motorbike and Drive to Mongolia

©Rémi Chapeaublanc

On Location Portrait Photography at the Back of the Stage

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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 On Location Portrait Photography at the Back of the Stage

©Adam Krause

On location portrait photography often requires intuitive thinking and fast decisions. But Adam Krause’s portrait of playwright Kwame Kwei-Armah is evidence that doesn’t have to be a bad thing.

New York-based portrait photographer Adam Krause was asked to photograph playwright Kwame Kwei-Armah at the Center Stage in Baltimore, where Kwei-Armah is the Creative Director. The images were to be published together with an upcoming magazine article, but as Adam did not know the angle of the article, he decided to go for a strong portrait that tied together Kwei-Armah with the theatre.

This meant that Adam had to shoot on location. Things were further complicated by the fact that he had only 30 minutes with Kwei-Armah to get his shot. “The biggest challenge was the lack of time,” says Adam. “Since this was an out-of-town shoot, we didn’t have enough time to arrive the day before, do a location scout, and come up with a game plan. So the very second we arrived at the location and brought in our equipment, we had to think as sharply as possible!”

 

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Mark Wallace’s Lighting Tips for Shooting On-location at Mid-day

Written by Mark Wallace on . Posted in Lighting Tips

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Mark Wallaces Lighting Tips for Shooting on Location in mid day Mark Wallaces Lighting Tips for Shooting On location at Mid day

©Mark Wallace

Shooting portraits on-location can give you terrific results. If the light is right things are a snap, but what happens when we have less than ideal conditions? With a bit of knowledge, and the right tools, you can even shoot outside at almost any time of day. A few months ago I was faced with a challenge. I needed to shoot a portrait using soft light the harsh desert light at mid-day. The light was absolutely horrible. Here’s how I tackled the issues.

 

Step One: Control the Ambient Light.

Screen Shot 2014 01 10 at 9.35.22 PM 600x358 Mark Wallaces Lighting Tips for Shooting On location at Mid day

The first thing I do when shooting on-location is to control the ambient light as much as possible. In this scenario I was shooting in an area with no shade at all. I set up a large translucent umbrella to shade my model. This softened the light and also took my exposure on the model down by about one stop. You can see in this photo that my model is in shade but the background is still in the sun.

I used my light meter to find the correct exposure for the background. In my test shot you can see that the background is exposed properly but my model is underexposed. An underexposed model means I would be able to use my flash to shape the light hitting her. This was shot at ISO 100, 1/200 @ f/11. Read More

Jeremiah Stanley Brings the New RFi Speedlight Speedring to a Rodeo in Florida

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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On October 1, Profoto released a new speedring that makes the RFi softboxes compatible with speedlights of most brands. Jeremiah Stanley brought it with him to shoot some cowboys at a rodeo in Florida. Here is his story.

What is the first thing that comes to mind when you hear the word “Florida”? We are guessing it is not cowboys, right? But that is something Jeremiah Stanley wants to change with his most recent portrait series.

“A 45 minute drive from where I live there is a small town called Williston where the western culture is very prominent, “ says Jeremiah. “People wear cowboy hats, there are tractors on the roads – they even have rodeos, which obviously isn’t something you’d normally associate with Florida. So, the idea was to go to this rodeo, set up some seamless and take some nice portraits of these nice people and this fascinating culture.”

Jeremiah had already started planning the shoot when he stumbled across our blog post asking for volunteers to try a not yet released Light Shaping Tool for speedlights. The announcement sparked Jeremiah’s interested, and the email he sent us sparked ours. Two weeks later he arrived at the Williston rodeo with the then yet to be released RFi Speedlight Speeding and a brand new Softbox RFi Octa 5’ in his bag. Read More

The RFi Speedlight Speedring: The Speedlight User’s Key to the World of Light Shaping

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in News

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Speedlights are great for many reasons, but being able to create a soft and shapable light is not one of them. Profoto can now offer a simple solution to this problem: the RFi Speedlight Speedring – a speedring that makes the Profoto RFi softboxes compatible with speedlights of most brands.

On November 1, 2012, Profoto released the RFi softboxes – a new line of softboxes comprising 12 sizes and four models. One of the most attention grabbing features of the RFi softbox line is the speedring adaptors that make Profoto’s softboxes compatible with well over 20 different flash brands.

Today, Profoto releases the latest addition to its assortment of speedring adaptors: a new and improved RFi Speedlight Speedring. The name clearly reveals what the tool does; it allows you to use an RFi softbox with speedlights, and thereby soften and shape the light.

But it does not end there. The RFi Speedlight Speedring allows you to mount not one but two speedlights on the bracket. This means that you now have enough power and punch to shoot in bright sunlight or light up an even larger softbox, such as the Softbox RFi 3×4’.

Each speedlight can slide and be tilted inside the softbox, allowing you to create a remarkably even light with no hotspot. The entire softbox can also be tilted, rotated 360° and adjusted high wise. In short, the RFi Speedlight Speedring allows you to shape the light however you see fit.

Also note that the RFi Speedlight Speedrings have color codes that match the RFi softbox rods. This makes the softboxes easy to mount, even for someone who has never used one before.

Last but not least, the RFi Speedlight Speedrings comes with an attachment for Profoto Air Remotes or radio sync units from other manufacturers.

Click here to learn more about the RFi Speedlight Speedring.

Tomorrow we will publish a behind-the-scenes video and an interview with Jeremiah Stanley, one of the photographers who replied to our blog post asking for volunteers to try a not yet released Light Shaping Tool for speedlights. Until then. Read More