Posts Tagged ‘Zoom Reflector’

Tips and Tricks for Getting a Natural Looking Result When Mixing Ambient Light with Strobes

Written by Jared Platt on . Posted in Lighting Tips

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0100 Jared Platt Profoto Tips and Tricks for Getting a Natural Looking Result When Mixing Ambient Light with Strobes

© Jared Platt

On November 19, Profoto and photographer Jared Platt will host a free webinar on how to get a natural-looking result when mixing ambient light with strobes on location. To get you in the mood for the webinar, Jared has written an article on the topic. Enjoy!

Scouting locations with a client recently, I came to realise how unimpressed the untrained eye is with open shade. A non-photographer will look at open shade, then look at the pretty sunlit trees and buildings across the street and think, “why is this photographer so impressed with this bland, shady side of the street?” But the client is only seeing what is there, not what is possible.

Finding open shade is the habit of natural light photographers all around the globe. In open shade you find cover from the harsh light of the sun and beautiful soft directional light from the sky; but many photographers only go as far as to find the open shade and begin shooting with the existing ambient light. This is a simple and fast way to work and yields some good images, but there is more beautiful light to be had in open shade if you have the imagination to see it and a few lights to make it happen.

When I see open shade, I see an opportunity to build and shape light. Read More

Walk Through a Wedding, Part 16: The Cake Cutting

Written by Rebecca Ahremark on . Posted in Wedding Photography

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Walk Through a Wedding is a yearlong video series on wedding photography, in which we follow Justin & Mary Marantz as they set out to capture a young couple’s most special day.

The series consists of 20 videos. Each video reveals the story and the lighting setup behind a certain image. In the sixteenth episode, Justin & Mary talk about how they capture the cutting of the wedding cake.

At this point in the reception we try to remain unobtrusive so we keep our lighting off to the side”, says Justin. “Things tend to happen really quickly during the cake cutting, so it’s always great to have a second angle.”

So, what setup did they use to light the cake cutting moment? The answer is: two B1 Off-Camera Flashes, wirelessly controlled with the Air Remote TTL-C. The off-camera flash to the right was equipped with an Umbrella Deep Translucent L while the one to the left had a Zoom Reflector on it.

When everything was in place, Justin got in front of the couple and took the traditional shot, while Mary went of to the side to get an alternative shot from a 120° angle.

Click play to dive a bit more into the details.

Previous episodes of Walk Through a Wedding can be found here. The next video will be released on November 3.

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Louis Pang Shoots Against the Shanghai Skyline

Written by Louis Pang on . Posted in On location

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Louis Pang is an international, award-winning photographer based in Malaysia. For this shoot, however, he changed the tropics for the mighty Putong skyline in Shanghai. Here is the full story in Louis’ own words. 

Winter in Shanghai is cold, humid and windy, a tough combination for someone who live in the tropics. A teaching gig brought me to Shanghai, and I would not pass up the opportunity to shoot in the Paris of the East – winter or no winter. My friends in Shanghai pulled some major strings to get Rose, a professional model from Beijing, to jet into Shanghai for the shoot. We started at 7am, thinking it would be wise to avoid the peak hour traffic and crowd.

First stop, the Bund which oversees the famous Putong skyline that is synonymous with Shanghai. Security personnel wanted us off the area because we didn’t have prior approval to shoot there. I have Gao Feng, a fantastic wedding photographer in Shanghai, to thank for convincing them to let us shoot just “10 minutes”. We left the Bund after many “10 minutes”.

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Portraits of People’s Faces When Hit With A Stun Gun

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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Portrait photographer Patrick Hall wanted to capture real emotions in real people. So he held a camera to their face and hit them with 300.000 volts of electricity. The result? Some stunning (haaa…) portraits and one of the most talked about videos this week!

“As a portrait photographer, you’re always trying to get something real,” says Patrick Hall. “And what’s interesting about this photo shoot is that there is no way you can fake your emotion or your expression when you’re getting hit with 300.000 volts of electricity.

Well, we can’t argue with that, Patrick…

The video, posted by the good people at Fstoppers, spread like wildfire. Of course, watching the video, we couldn’t help but notice what tools Patrick was using – three Profoto D1 1.000 Ws moonlights, two HR Softboxes and a classic Zoom Reflector.

Those of you who want to get into the nitty gritty details about Patrick’s setup and solution should defintiely check out his thorough behind-the-scenes video, which you will find below.

You should also head over to Fstoppers for the full story and more final shots.

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How to Use Backlight to Photograph Glassware

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Product Photography

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How to use backlight to photograph glassware Taka Kawachi 1 600x382 How to Use Backlight to Photograph Glassware

©Taka Kawachi

The awesome photography site Popular Photography has an ongoing article series called How To, in which photographers are interviewed about the different lighting techniques they use to achieve different effects.

The latest article highlights an ambitious shoot done by New York-based product photographer Taka Kawachi and how he used backlight to photograph glassware for a department store chain.

“For two solid weeks in 2012, Taka Kawachi, a product specialist who works out of a studio in Nyack, NY, shot nothing but glassware for a major department store chain,” writes Peter Kolonia. “Juice, highball, and shot glasses, tumblers, stemware of every size and shape, and, yes, pilsner glasses and beer mugs. If he wasn’t a master of lighting glass at the project’s outset, he certainly was by its end.”

Head over to the Popular Photography site for the full story.