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Posts Tagged ‘Zoom Reflector’

Portraits of People’s Faces When Hit With A Stun Gun

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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Portrait photographer Patrick Hall wanted to capture real emotions in real people. So he held a camera to their face and hit them with 300.000 volts of electricity. The result? Some stunning (haaa…) portraits and one of the most talked about videos this week!

“As a portrait photographer, you’re always trying to get something real,” says Patrick Hall. “And what’s interesting about this photo shoot is that there is no way you can fake your emotion or your expression when you’re getting hit with 300.000 volts of electricity.

Well, we can’t argue with that, Patrick…

The video, posted by the good people at Fstoppers, spread like wildfire. Of course, watching the video, we couldn’t help but notice what tools Patrick was using – three Profoto D1 1.000 Ws moonlights, two HR Softboxes and a classic Zoom Reflector.

Those of you who want to get into the nitty gritty details about Patrick’s setup and solution should defintiely check out his thorough behind-the-scenes video, which you will find below.

You should also head over to Fstoppers for the full story and more final shots.

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How to Use Backlight to Photograph Glassware

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Product Photography

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How to use backlight to photograph glassware Taka Kawachi 1 600x382 How to Use Backlight to Photograph Glassware

©Taka Kawachi

The awesome photography site Popular Photography has an ongoing article series called How To, in which photographers are interviewed about the different lighting techniques they use to achieve different effects.

The latest article highlights an ambitious shoot done by New York-based product photographer Taka Kawachi and how he used backlight to photograph glassware for a department store chain.

“For two solid weeks in 2012, Taka Kawachi, a product specialist who works out of a studio in Nyack, NY, shot nothing but glassware for a major department store chain,” writes Peter Kolonia. “Juice, highball, and shot glasses, tumblers, stemware of every size and shape, and, yes, pilsner glasses and beer mugs. If he wasn’t a master of lighting glass at the project’s outset, he certainly was by its end.”

Head over to the Popular Photography site for the full story.

While Most Photographers Try to Stop the Kids from Doing Silly Faces, Greg Koch Pushes Them to Do Even Sillier

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Portrait Photography

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Profoto Greg Koch 1 While Most Photographers Try to Stop the Kids from Doing Silly Faces, Greg Koch Pushes Them to Do Even Sillier

©Greg Koch

If you’ve ever tried photographing kids, you’re no stranger to silly faces. But while most of us who put these shots in the drawer, San Fransisco-based photographer Greg Koch saves and frames the silly faces only. 

“When I initially approached my son’s school with the idea of doing a photo project for their art class, I hadn’t yet realized the concept of silly faces,” says Greg Koch. “I only knew I wanted to do a studio shoot. I had just purchased a Profoto Pro-B4 pack and was eager to test it before a couple of client shoots I had the following week.

“When preparing for the shoot in the studio with my son, I kept trying to get a smile out of him.  He, in turn, kept making silly faces.  That’s when inspiration struck. Why should I try to get all of these kids to do something as unnatural as posing?  Wouldn’t it be better to shoot them with all their natural charisma and energy?  The idea felt very natural and I decided to push forward with it. The Silly Faces project was born.”

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How to Do a High-Key Portrait

Written by Oleg Ti on . Posted in Lighting Tips

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highkey12 How to Do a High Key Portrait

©Oleg Ti

Photographer Oleg Ti knows light. He also knows how to share that knowledge. In this post he’ll use the D1 monolight to show us how to do a high-key portrait. It’s good stuff. Keep reading.

Many photographers just starting to work in the studio attempt to solve the difficulty of a well-lit high-key portrait by increasing the amount of light sources. They keep adding more and more softboxes, reflectors and umbrellas in their quest for a glossy and shiny portrait.

In my opinion, that isn’t the best approach. The main advantage of working in the studio is that you’re in absolute control of the light. You control the amount of light sources, the position of the light sources, the character of the light, etcetera. So rather than just adding more and more light sources, you should divert your focus to getting each and every light source to do exactly the thing you want it to do.

Personally, I always try to use as few light sources possible.  I also prefer using hard lights to get extensive and concise pictures. So, here I’ll show you how to create a high-key portrait using four hard light sources.

Let’s begin!

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These Sparkling Portraits Will Put Stars in Your Eyes

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in Beauty Photography

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Profoto D1 monolight Andrea Zvadova 14 600x400 These Sparkling Portraits Will Put Stars in Your Eyes

©Andrea Zvadova

The stars in the sky have been a source of inspiration for artists ever since we humans first started to express ourselves creatively. If you want a modern day example from the world of photography, look no further. Andrea Zvadova’s sparkling portraits will put stars in your eyes.

“When you’re away from the city and you see the stars in the sky, you feel so close to them,” says Andrea. “The world becomes quiet for a while. The same goes for the northern lights, slowly glowing in the air, floating, and radiating vivid colors. It was this startling sensation of looking up at the night sky that I tried to capture in these images.”

Andrea could have achieved this result in a number of ways. But rather than relying on postproduction, she decided to get as much as possible in camera.

“It was mostly done with makeup and lighting,” says Andrea. “I have makeup artist Lukáš Kimlika to thank for much of it. Lukáš covered the model’s face in glitter and colors. You know, I’d never seen so much glitter in my life before! The five-year-old me would’ve been the happiest girl in the world that day! It still was a lot of fun, but also very messy. For every shot we had to remove all the make-up and start all over again. That’s why we had two models, Karolina from Elite and Tasha from Exit. They both ended up with black glittery faces and had to go home looking like Star Wars characters. The studio was, of course, also covered in glitter. There was a lot of cleaning up to do that day…” Read More

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