Spice Up Your Lighting with the WideZoom Reflector

Written by Fredrik Franzén on . Posted in The Light Shaper

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Andrea Belluso is an experienced photographer with more than three decades in the business. Once a month, Andrea takes us behind the scenes of a recent shoot to share some of the knowledge he has gained over the years. This time he shows us how to use the WideZoom Reflector in a creative, out-of-the-box way.

I was recently approached by the staff at Klassik Magazine asking me to do a fashion story based on the official trend forecast for 2015 stating that India will be a great source of inspiration. I gave the brief some thought and realized that I wanted to shoot different kinds of images but with a consistent look and feel – as one normally does in an editorial fashion story. I also knew I wanted a hard light with a lot of contrast and dramatic shadows.

There are a number of Profoto hard reflectors that can do this. But for this particular shoot I chose the WideZoom Reflector. The WideZoom Reflector creates a wider, more even light than any other Profoto hard reflector. For this reason I often use it as a background light. But on this shoot I decided to use it in a non-traditional way. I used it as a sidelight. This allowed me to create the heavy shadows I needed, while at the same time spilling some nice light onto the background. Also, using the same Light Shaping Tool in different ways for different shots would help me achieve the consistent look and feel I was going for.

 

Profoto WideZoom Reflector Andrea Belluso The Light Shaper KLASSIC MAG05 Spice Up Your Lighting with the WideZoom Reflector

©Andrea Belluso

The headshot of the model lying on a bed of spices with the Buddha heads next to her was shot with just a single light source: a D1 monolight equipped with a WideZoom Reflector. Shaping the light with the WideZoom Reflector gave me a nice and even light even on the spices and on the Buddha heads.

 

Profoto WideZoom Reflector Andrea Belluso The Light Shaper KLASSIC MAG04 Spice Up Your Lighting with the WideZoom Reflector

©Andrea Belluso

The same goes for the picture where the model is standing in front of a brown wall, throwing a handful of spices. Once again, I had a D1 with a WideZoom Reflector as my sidelight, creating me a nice and hard but even light on the model and on the spices.

 

Profoto WideZoom Reflector Andrea Belluso The Light Shaper KLASSIC MAG02 Spice Up Your Lighting with the WideZoom Reflector

©Andrea Belluso

Profoto The Light Shaper Spice up your Lighting with the WideZoom Reflector BTS 2 600x494 Spice Up Your Lighting with the WideZoom Reflector

Profoto The Light Shaper Spice up your Lighting with the WideZoom Reflector BTS 10 600x336 Spice Up Your Lighting with the WideZoom Reflector

The picture with the model sitting in lotus position was also shot using just a single D1 with a Widezoom Reflector. But in this case the light was positioned above the model. She was sitting very close to wall, and the D1 was positioned just above her, also very close to the wall. This created the shadows that fell nicely on the model and on the background too. As mentioned before, this is far from the wide and even light spread you commonly associate with the WideZoom Reflector. The reason for this unusual effect is, of course, that I placed the light so close the model.

Again, using the WideZoom Reflector as a sidelight or for creating intense shadows and a dramatic falloff is not something I usually do. But by understanding the properties of a certain tool, you are free to bend the rules and use the tool in a creative, out-of-the box way. I believe this kind of thinking is a great recipe for spicing up your lighting. Plus, the job gets a lot more fun when you do not always stick to the beaten track.

 

Profoto Andrea Belluso small Spice Up Your Lighting with the WideZoom Reflector

Ciao,

Andrea Belluso

Andrea’s website

More setups by The Light Shaper

 

Profoto WideZoom Reflector Andrea Belluso The Light Shaper KLASSIC MAG01 Spice Up Your Lighting with the WideZoom Reflector

©Andrea Belluso

Profoto WideZoom Reflector Andrea Belluso The Light Shaper KLASSIC MAG03 Spice Up Your Lighting with the WideZoom Reflector

©Andrea Belluso

Profoto The Light Shaper Spice up your Lighting with the WideZoom Reflector BTS 1 600x400 Spice Up Your Lighting with the WideZoom Reflector

Profoto The Light Shaper Spice up your Lighting with the WideZoom Reflector BTS 11 600x338 Spice Up Your Lighting with the WideZoom Reflector

Profoto The Light Shaper Spice up your Lighting with the WideZoom Reflector BTS 15 600x337 Spice Up Your Lighting with the WideZoom Reflector

KLASSIC SPREADS1 600x357 Spice Up Your Lighting with the WideZoom Reflector

KLASSIC SPREADS2 600x357 Spice Up Your Lighting with the WideZoom Reflector

KLASSIC SPREADS3 600x357 Spice Up Your Lighting with the WideZoom Reflector

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Comments (14)

  • david

    |

    Thank you very much Andrea. I learned a lot from this post. I have two questions.
    1, If we use Magnum reflector in this shot with the same lighting setup, what we would get?
    2, Could we use Fresnel lens(such as profoto Cine reflector with Fresnel lens in place) in this shot instead of Widezoom reflector? Will we get similar results?
    Thank you very much for your time.

    Reply

    • Andrea Belluso

      Andrea Belluso

      |

      Hi David!
      Really glad you learned from the post ;-)
      To answer your questions, if you use a Magnum reflector instead of a Widezoom reflector you will not have the same effect because the Magnum and the Widezoom have two different zoom curves, meaning that the curve of the light beam is totally different on the two. On the Widezoom reflector the curve is much flatter, giving a much wider and more even light beamthan the Magnum, so for instance on te shot with the model lying down with the Buddha heads we would have had a much more dramatic light fall off over the picture since we had a side light.
      And on the picture with the model sitting in the lotus position we would have had a narrower light beam on the background at that position.
      To answer your second question, the Fresnel lens is normally used for that very special feeling that it gives. The Fresnel lens is greenish in tone, which means that it reduces the magenta in skin tones, and be doing that it gives a very nice feeling to the skin.
      The Cine Reflector does not have as wide a light beam nor light spread as the Widezoom reflector, so the answer will be the same as for the Magnum.

      I hope my answer was not too confusing ;-)
      Ciao!

      Reply

      • david

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        Many thanks for your thorough and very helpful explanation. I get it. I am amazed by what one light with widezoom can do. I have Magnum, telezoom. I like the fall off of Magnum and the ability of telezoom to throw light. But sometimes I just need the even and contrast light. I think I should try the widezoom.

        Reply

        • Andrea Belluso

          Andrea Belluso

          |

          David, really happy I was not too confusing with my explanation ;-)
          Yes, I really think the Widezoom is a very useful tool, I normally use it for very wide and even light for backdrops.
          Please do share the films, the larger audience I get on the series the more possibilities I will have in the future to bring you even more inspiring videos from my shoots ;-)

          Reply

          • David

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            I have shared the film. I look forward to seeing more videos from you. This is a brilliant series. Many thanks for your sharing.

            Reply

  • Juan Carlos

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    Excellent and thank you for the light diagram !!! I must confess that I have the Profoto Wide Zoom Reflector and I have rarely used it in favor of the Magnum. I guess I will be using it from now on !!!

    Great shots and the editing is fantastic !!!

    Gracias !!!

    Reply

    • Andrea Belluso

      Andrea Belluso

      |

      De nada Juan Carlos!
      Göad you like the film.
      Please remember to share it so that I get more viewers and therefore more opportunities to bring you more inspiring films ;-)

      Happy Easter!

      Reply

  • RAJESH JAIN

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    It is very nice shoot….as well d result of wide zoom reflector is amazing,,, Thanks to Pro Photo Light Shaping…

    Reply

    • Andrea Belluso

      Andrea Belluso

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      Thank you Rajesh!
      Glad you like it!
      :-)

      Reply

  • Linda Crosby

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    Excellent! We were fence sitting a bit about purchasing this light as it seemed most people thought you needed two or three or four and we are a small studio with limited funds. Your video helped us make the leap and we think this will be the game changer that will take our work to the next level! Thanks so much!

    Reply

    • Andrea Belluso

      Andrea Belluso

      |

      Really glad to hear that Linda :-)
      Enjoy your new toys then and take that leap!

      Reply

    • Andrea Belluso

      Andrea Belluso

      |

      Thank you fstoppers for a very nice feature :-)

      Reply

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